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    MANILA, Philippines – The student councils of the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of the Phiippines Diliman are capitalizing on the frenzy over the upcoming UAAP Finals opener between their respective teams to unite the two schools on issues that matter. (READ: Ateneo hopes to match wildly excited U.P. crowd

    In two separate Facebook posts, ADMU Sanggunian and UP Diliman University Student Council (USC) jointly urged those watching the game live to wear black “as a protest against violence, impunity, and misogyny.”

    {source}

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    {/source}

    Tickets to the much-awaited game sold out quickly as hundreds lined up at different SM Tickets outlets, hoping to watch the game live at the SM Mall of Asia Arena

    “In the #BattleOfKatipunan tomorrow, let us always remember that our struggles go beyond the game that we’re cheering for, and these struggles are always within our community,” UP Diliman USC said.

    Win or lose, it’s the nation we choose!” ADMU Sanggunian also said. 

    Netizens took this call to action positively as they commended both student councils for the impressive display of camaraderie in the name of their love for the nation.

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Solid to! &lt;3</p>&mdash; leo (@marklituanas) <a href="https://twitter.com/marklituanas/status/1068511690843537410?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 30, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Coordinating with Ateneo Sanggu with the calls for the game tomorrow. Really, really excited for the collab of the 2 universities! <br><br>WEAR BLACK to the games tomorrow! Whichever team you’re supporting, Ateneo team man yan or UP let’s show them how strong we are. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/oustDuterte?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#oustDuterte</a></p>&mdash; Kisha Beringuela (@kishaberinguela) <a href="https://twitter.com/kishaberinguela/status/1068497412262481922?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 30, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">ATENEO and UP are one against violence.<br><br>Win or lose, it’s the nation we choose!<br><br>We urge everyone to wear black for tomorrow’s game as a protest against violence, impunity, and misogyny. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/OurSanggu?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#OurSanggu</a> <a href="https://t.co/okvx6zjQpx">https://t.co/okvx6zjQpx</a></p>&mdash; Ivan Bueno (@ivanlewisbueno) <a href="https://twitter.com/ivanlewisbueno/status/1068498534813458432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 30, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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    {/source}

    What do you think of this move? Share your thoughts below! – Rappler.com  


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    CAGAYAN DE ORO, Philippines – Mindanao Pride, an emerging social movement that advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) rights and welfare in the island’s regions, will be celebrating the first Kadaiyahan Festival in Cagayan de Oro city this December 5 to 10.

    Set to take place with 4 primary activities over 5 days, the festival aims to spread awareness about issues and concerns regarding individuals whose gender identity and sexual orientation transcend socially constructed norms. LGBTQ+ organizations from all over Mindanao will gather for the event and unite to express their pride.

    Although this isn’t the first festival that celebrates diversity in Mindanao and in the Philippines, Kadaiyahan will highlight the possible inclusivity that can be shared by identified LGBTQ+ members and straight allies who support their cause. It took its name from the literal Bisaya translation for diversity.

    Exploring LGBT issues

    The festival will include campaigns that reflect the aspirations of the LGBTQ+ community and educate participants about the discrimination, harassment, and prejudice they face.

    “We believe this is the time for Mindanao to shine when it comes to this initiative,” documentary filmmaker and rights activist Rhadem Morados said in an interview.

    Known for his stance and support for the LGBTQ+ community in Mindanao, Morados will be one of the speakers for the 3-day lecture series, one of the festival’s primary activities.

    The lecture series, dubbed as “#LGBTMindaNOW”, will involve discussions about the HIV/AIDS  epidemic and other STDs and their prevention; legal cases that can be addressed by the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression (SOGIE) Equality Bill; and the situation of LGBTQ+ individuals under the Bangsamoro Organic Law. Each topic is slated for one day from December 6 to 8 at local venues.

    “There are many unreported and unrecorded cases of abuse towards LGBT,” Morados said. “Most of the time these aren’t properly addressed because we don’t know where to go and how to use the law on our side.”

    Morados hopes for the festival to change the public’s views about the LGBTQ+.

    Besides the lectures, selected student leaders from schools in the city will be provided with a training workshop to familiarize with the SOGIE Equality Bill and its advantages to combat gender-related bullying. This will take place from December 6 to 8.

    To lead the way towards these discussions, the festival will open with a film screening of Cinema One Originals finalist “Mamu; And a Mother Too” directed by Rod Singh at one of the cinemas of SM CDO Downtown Premiere. The film recently made headlines after its lead, Iya Minah, became the first transgender to win Best Actress in the film competition.

    Pride March

    The festival will also pave the way for the pride march which will culminate on the last day. This will be participated by various movements and groups that advance the LGBTQ+ cause.

    Mindanao Pride co-founder Hamilcar Chanjueco emphasized the relevance of Kadaiyahan’s pride march. He pointed out that the march is not just for the sake of what’s trending, but that it will take place because of what it means to the community. Part of the march’s route will take place along the city’s downtown and historic Plaza Divisoria where a program will follow.

    “We need to recognize the LGBTs who are in the margins of society,” he said, referring to individuals who may be identified as such but are facing risks by being differently abled or or are being harassed by their religion and culture.

    “We are fighting because we know that there are gaps in our society that we need to highlight,” he added.

    The pride march may be inspired by similar LGBTQ+ movements from around the world, but what makes it unique is the reality that all Mindanaoans, not just the LGBTQ+ community, share – a common home despite diversity in religion, traditions, and languages.

    Kadaiyahan will also lift barriers between the LGBTQ+ community and straight allies to underscore inclusivity despite differences.

    “This is everybody’s event,” Morados remarked. “The [LGBTQ+] community contributes to the progress of Mindanao, and we need to empower everyone.”

    “With this, we can reach our utmost potential as one Mindanao,” he added. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – For students, alumni, and the rest of the University of Philippines (UP) community, it was not just a simple joke on social media.

    After threatening the safety of Ateneo Blue Eagles in a post online, the UP community called on Frederick “Spocky” Farolan to step down from his post as UP regent. In a cryptic post made after UP lost to the defending champions in Game 1 of the UAAP Season 81 Finals, he said that the Ateneo Blue Eagles will be "injured" before their next game on Wednesday, December 5. 

    On social media, members of the UP community said that his behavior is unbecoming of a UP official and is not representative of the principles the state university uphold.

    This was echoed by Senator Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan, who said Farolan’s “views expressed on social media are totally unacceptable and a disgrace to the University of the Philippines.” Pangilinan served as a member of the UP Board of Regents twice – first as Student Regent in 1986 and then as ex officio member in 2003. 

    UP President Danilo Concepcion also denounced the controversial Facebook post in his statement released Sunday night, December 2. He said this issue will be taken up during the Board of Regents meeting happening Monday morning, December 3.

    "While this regent has deleted the post and has apologized for its contents, claiming that they were made in jest, I wish to make it clear the University of the Philippines takes these statements seriously and dissociates itself from the post and from the actuations of this regent, matters which I intend to take up with the Board of Regents," Concepcion said.

    While Farolan already deleted his post and apologized online, netizens said this is not enough. Below are some online posts calling on Farolan’s resignation:

    {source}

    <iframe src="https://web.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fweb.facebook.com%2Ffilomenoiii%2Fposts%2F10156737857904360&width=500" width="500" height="317" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>

    <a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/MovePH/timelines/1069383311225630720?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">Netizens: Farolan resign - Curated tweets by MovePH</a> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

     

    This is not the first time people urged Farolan to step down from his post. Earlier in April, he hit back at some commenters who slammed the delayed release of the UP College Admission Test (UPCAT) results, prompting a lawmaker to call for his resignation as UP regent.

    He said,“Forgive me for saying this…pero ‘yung mga kung makahirit e parang hulog ng Diyos kayo para sa UP, siguraduhin ‘nyo lang na papasa kayo ng UPCAT. Dahil kung hindi, lalaitin ko pati kaibuturan ng kaluluwa niyo (Those who are criticizing us act like they are godsent to the university. Make sure to pass the UPCAT. Otherwise, I will belittle you ’till the very depths of your soul).”

    What do you think about the calls for Farolan's resignation? Let us know in the comments below! – Rappler.com 


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    MANILA, Philippines – Following the controversial Facebook post of University of the Philippines (UP) regent Frederick "Spocky" Farolan, the UP Board of Regents revoked its recommendation for his reappointment.

    "Committed to a higher standard of accountability for its members, the Board hereby withdraws its recommendation for the reappointment of Regent Farolan to the Board of Regents," the board said in a statement on Monday, December 3.

    Farolan had said that 3 Ateneo Blue Eagles would be "injured" before Game 2 of the UAAP Finals on Wednesday, December 5. (LOOK: U.P. official threatens safety of Ateneo Blue Eagles)

    The regent made the post after the loss of the UP Fighting Maroons in Game 1 last Saturday, December 1.

    "Sayang hindi kumpleto ang players ng Ateneo sa Wednesday. Tatlo injured. Pili na kung sino-sino mga 'yon," wrote Farolan in a now-deleted Facebook post.

    (Too bad the Ateneo players won't be complete on Wednesday. Three will be injured. Just pick who these 3 will be.)

    After calls for his resignation, Farolan claimed his post was all sarcasm and then later apologized. (READ: U.P. community calls on regent to resign following controversial UAAP post)

    This is not the first time people have urged Farolan to step down from his post. Back in April, he hit back at people who slammed the delayed release of the UP College Admission Test (UPCAT) results, drawing flak.

    The UP Board of Regents said that while they take note of Farolan's apology, they are dissociating the board from his statements and actions.

    "Whatever his motives may have been, there is no excuse for sowing fear and confusion, especially at a time when the university's attention should have been focused on the rising successes of its athletic program," the board said.

    It added that it continues to uphold the principles of civility and sportsmanship, and that it "strongly condemns violence in any form."

    The board also apologized to the Ateneo de Manila University, especially to the Blue Eagles.

    Farolan's term as UP regent expired last October 28. – Rappler.com


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    FRATERNITIES AND SOCIETY. Professor Gerry Lanuza talks about the the patriarchal system in families. Photo by Lisa Marie David/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – With the recent incidents of frat-related violence (FRV) reported on campus, the University of the Philippines (UP) Department of Sociology has started a series of teach-ins to make students understand what breeds this medieval thinking among frat men. 

    The first session about fraternities and society, held on November 29, tackled what frat wars are as well as where machismo, sexism, bigotry, and homophobia are rooted and embedded in society. (READ: UP’s gangland wars: A historical note

    An unverified but viral series of offensive, sexists, and hateful conversations attributed to a UP fraternity and the recent FRV incidents on campus sparked discussions on whether these organizations should still exist. (READ: Inside the brotherhood: Thoughts on fraternity violence)

    The UP Department of Sociology was among the first departments in UP that posted a statement to denounce the alleged frat conversations.

    Reinforced in families

    Professor Gerry Lanuza said it all boils down to a flawed patriarchal system that enforces the domination of men over women. This way of thinking is deeply embedded in society through "family socialization," where men are raised to be dominant and analytic. Women, on the other hand, are raised to possess the opposite of what are deemed to be masculine traits. This culture dates back from the time of colonizers, with machismo being an example of a value we developed from Spaniards.

    "Ang ipinapaliwanag ko dito ay sa isang malapiyudal na pamilya, na patriarchal, kung saan ang tatay mo ay siyang pinaka-head sa hierarchy – eto ang kalalabasan," Lanuza said. (My explanation is that in a feudal-like family, wherein the father is the head of the hierarchy, this would be the result.)

    TIME TO LEARN. Students gather at the AS Lobby in UP during part 1 of the teach-in on Fraternities and Society. Photo by Lisa Marie David/Rappler

    A patriarchal system manifests later on in fraternities, where a show of strength and masculinity is important to show power within and among other fraternities. At times, this will result in rumbles or fraternity-related violence to see who has the upper hand.

    While Lanuza recognized that fraternity violence is rooted in our faulty and patriarchal system, he noted that such incidents must neither be condoned nor ignored.

    He said this culture is not irreversible.

    Hindi ko sinasabi na fixed ito. Hindi ko sinasabi na nasa genes.... Ang sinasabi ko ay produkto iyan ng dynamic socialization sa loob ng pamilya. So, ang ibig sabihin, mababago 'yan,” Lanuza said.

    (I am not saying that this is fixed. I am not saying that this is in the genes…. What I am saying is that this is a product of dynamic socialization in a family. It means it can be changed.)

    Patriarchy and how we understand it

    Sociology professor Andoy Evangelista explained how patriarchy manifests in fraternities and in society.

    A patriarchal system exists to maintain power within the lineage.

     “Ang gustong tiyakin ng patriarchy ay 'yung line of inheritance of wealth and power ay mananatili sa kanyang bloodline,” said Evangelista. (The patriarchy wants to ensure that the line of inheritance of wealth and power will stay in his bloodline.)

    The same mindset can be found in fraternities and sororities: the connection and power they have should stay within the group and be passed on to their brothers and sisters.

    Symbols also legitimize the violence inherent in patriarchy, evident in initiation rites of fraternities and sororities.

    Evangelista cited a quote from a group of men, “We will give light to the world.” This is similar to Upsilon Sigma Phi's motto, "We gather light to scatter."

    He pointed out the problematic thinking enforced by the motto. It is misogynistic in implying that only the group can enlighten the world.

    Change in the system and ourselves

    Although violence is deeply seated in culture and society, we also have ourselves to blame.

    Kung ang pangarap natin ay isang lipunan na anti-capitalist, anti-misogyny, anti-patriarchal, we have to also examine our own positions kasi produkto rin tayo ng lipunan na iyon,” said Evangelista. 

    (If our dream is a society that is anti-capitalist, anti-misogyny, anti-patriarchal, we have to also examine our own positions because we are also a product of that system.)

    Sociology professor Jo Dionisio left a few remarks on how we can better our society and ourselves.

    Kailangan din natin tingnan ang paraan ng pag-iisip, pananalita, at interaksiyon sa mga kapwa, na siyang pinagdadaanan kung pano napapanitili ang ganitong sistema,” said Dionisio. 

    (We also have to look at our way of thinking, speaking, and interacting with other people that enables this kind of system to keep going.)

    “Violence is in our everyday lives, and if we want to get rid of violence [in our society], we have to get rid of it in our everyday lives,” added Dionisio.

    Part two of the discussion will be on Thursday, December 6. – Rappler.com

    Jaira Krishelle Balboa is a Rappler intern and a 4th year BA Journalism student at the Polytechnic University of the Philippines.

    Lisa Marie David is a Rappler intern and a 4th year AB Journalism student at the University of Santo Tomas.


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    ACCEPTANCE. A Catholic priest hugs a person with HIV at the Grand Marian Procession in Intramuros, Manila. Photo Courtesy of Manila Red Cross Youth

    MANILA, Philippines – “Ignore me and my vestment. It’s the campaign to break the stigma.”

    This was the heartwarming message of Fr. Alvin Pila of the Malolos Diocese after embracing Joross de Vera, a person living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (PLHIV), during the Grand Marian Procession on Sunday, December 2, in Intramuros, Manila.

    I was not expecting any of them [to approach me] since it was a procession at baka bawal humiwalay sa kanilang mga grupo,” De Vera said. (I’m thinking that they are not allowed to leave from their groups.)

    In an interview with Rappler, Pila admitted he was hesitant at first to approach De Vera. But upon seeing the smile on the priest's face, he gave him a hug. 

    It’s the Jesus’ way. Namimili ako kung i-cross ko ba siya? Lay hands, kawayan lang? Pero nasa isip ko na kung nandito si Jesus, yayakap 'yun,” Pila shared. (I was choosing between giving him a sign of the cross? Or just laying my hands on him. Or merely waving at him? But I thought that if Jesus was here, he would give a hug.)

    According to Pila what he did was an act from his heart since he belongs to an institution that is also wounded and weak but was saved by the love of Jesus. He added that more love would end the sitgma on PLHIV.  (READ: ‘Stop HIV shaming’: When status is not the story)

    In 2017, UNAIDS has recorded an estimated 68,000 Filipinos diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, and the numbers continue to rise. According to the Philippine National AIDS Council, in 2018, as many as 32 Filipinos are diagnosed daily with HIV/AIDS. (READ: IN NUMBERS: Global HIV/AIDS cases still on the rise)

    De Vera told Rappler that he was grateful for the gesture of Fr. Pila, which he said was a “a big deal and that it conveys a message of acceptance.” He recounted that Pila even whispered to him saying: “Jesus loves you and the church loves you.”

    'Just love'

    The heartwarming photo went viral online, commending Pila's act. As of this writing, the Manila Red Cross Youth's post has gotten more than 5,800 reactions and over 4,700 shares. 

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FManilaRCY%2Fposts%2F1917640111646505&width=500" width="500" height="712" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

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    Some netizens appealed for public understanding and love for PLHIV.

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FManilaRCY%2Fposts%2F1917640111646505%3Fcomment_id%3D1918840628193120&include_parent=false" width="560" height="160" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FManilaRCY%2Fposts%2F1917640111646505%3Fcomment_id%3D1918934524850397&include_parent=false" width="560" height="200" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FManilaRCY%2Fposts%2F1917640111646505%3Fcomment_id%3D1917788721631644&include_parent=false" width="560" height="120" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    For De Vera, stigmatizing will only cause harm. He said everyone should embrace each other regardless of health status. (READ: 'We will win this': Advocates call to end HIV, AIDS stigma)

    “Break out of the tradition and stand up for what is right and true,” he said. Rappler.com


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    PRESS FREEDOM. 12 Filipino journalists are recognized for defending press freedom during LODI's Sigaw Para sa Katotohanan on Thursday, December 6, held in the Rappler newsroom. Photo by LeAnne Jazul/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Amid threats to press freedom in the Philippines, the arts and media alliance Let’s Organize for Democracy and Integrity (LODI) on Thursday, December 6, recognized internationally-acclaimed Filipino journalists for their excellence and courage. 

    In the event dubbed as "Sigaw Para sa Katotohanan" (SIKATO), LODI, its partner groups, and the honorees showed the government that the media is united and strong despite the attacks against them.

    “We think the situation actually summons the best and most courageous in journalism so that media could exercise their rights and perform their duty to inform and consequently empower the Filipino people,” LODI convenor and steering committee Joel Lamangan said during the ceremony held in the Rappler newsroom in Pasig City.

    Lamangan added: “It is already difficult to do good journalism under normal circumstances, but it is more challenging now under President Duterte who seem to want a pliant, blinded, submissive media."

    Commission on Human Rights chairperson Chito Gascon also graced the event. He asked journalists to continue the hard work especially in these crucial times. “Your task as journalists is to present the truth to people for them to unite against all the lies. We are always behind you in your struggle for the truth, ” he said.

    DEFENDING FREE PRESS. Internationally-acclaimed journalists Fernando "Jun" Sepe Jr, Inday Espina-Varona and Manny Mogato. Photo by Leanne Jazul/Rappler

    The gathering honored at least 12 journalists for their achievement in the cause of press freedom, including Rappler CEO and Executive Editor Maria Ressa.

    The awardees were given trophies made by sculptor and painter Toym Imao, whose works are exhibited in major cities in the Philippines, United States, Europe and Vietnam. Aside from the trophy, each honoree received a caricature drawn by artist Ted Camahalan. 

    In her acceptance speech, Ressa thanked the groups for the award, noting that it's the first from Filipinos this year. Ressa, who is facing tax evasion cases before the Court of Tax Appeals and the Pasig Regional Trial Court has been awarded by international organizations, such as the recent Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

    Other honorees are the following multi-awarded journalists:

    • Inday Espina-Varona - She was awarded the Prize for Independence at the 2018 Press Freedom Awards by the Paris-based Reporters Without Borders.
    • Manuel Mogato - He received the Pulitzer Award for International Reporting for their series entitled Duterte's War. He also won the Roy Rowan Award for best investigative reporting of the Overseas Press Club Award.
    • Fernando Sepe Jr, Jonathan Cellona, and Val Cuenca - They won in the Interactive Category of International awards for factual content by the Association for International Broadcasting for their work entitled "Stories From Under the Rubble: Inside the Battle of Marawi."
    • Atom Araullo - He won in the Science, Technology and Nature Category of  the International awards for factual content by the Association for International Broadcasting for his documentary entitled Philippine Seas. He also received the 2 Gold Camera award at the US International Film & Video Festival for "Philippine Seas" and "Silang Kinalimutan". (Araullo's award was received during the ceremony by Howie Severino.)
    • Raffy Tima - He won the Silver Screen Award from the US International Film & Video Festival for his work "Inside Marawi: A Report On 360 Video." (Tima's award was received during the ceremony by his wife, GMA7 reporter Mariz Umali.)
    • Jeff Canoy and Chiara Zambrano - They won the Gold Dolphin for Best Documentary under the Current Affairs, Human Concerns, and Social Issues Category of the 9th Cannes Corporate Media and TV Awards for their work entitled "Di Ka Pasisiil, a story on the Marawi siege." They also received the Gold World Medal in the New York Festivals  under the World's Best TV & Films category. (Canoy's and Zambrano's awards were received during the ceremony by Sepe)
    • Basilio Sepe - He bagged the 2018 International Photography Awards Filipino for his work entitled "The Enemy in the Dark."
    • Ezra Acayan - He won the 2018 Grand Prize Award of the International Academic ForumDocumentary Photography Award for his work entitled "Duterte’s War On Drugs Is Not Over." It also won the Award for Achievement of the Ian Parry Scholarship.

    'Not the time to be afraid'

    Varona said the recognition is a reminder of how Filipino journalists continue to fight for a free press.

    We remember the sacrifices that fellow journalists have given for press to remain free. Ilang taon man, buwan ang lumipas...bukas makalawa man, tuloy ang laban,” said Varona. (Even if it takes more years and months, we will continue the fight.) 

    She said that free press defenders must "celebrate a year of survival and surviving against those who want to kill our press freedom.”

    For award-winning photojournalist Acayan, they continue doing what they do because they want to give voice to the oppressed. "That’s what we all do as journalists," he added.

    FREE PRESS. Award-wining photojournalist Ezra Acayan is recognized during the SIKATO on Thursday, December 6, for his excellence and courage in producing stories related to President Rodrigo Duterte's drug war. Photo by Leanne Jazul/Rappler

    Basilio Sepe, a young photojournalist, stressed the importance of free and fearless reporting, especially at this time when the administration is trying to discredit media organizations for delivering reliable information to people.

    “This is not the time to be afraid. It is the time that our voices need to be heard. A threat to the freedom of the press is also a threat to our democracy," Sepe said.

    Ressa earlier dedicated the awards she received to the Rappler team.

    “We at Rappler decided that when we look back at this moment a decade from now, we will have done everything we could: we did not duck, we did not hide... We are Rappler, and we will hold the line," she said. (READ: Maria Ressa back in PH: Don’t let the gov’t cross the line– Rappler.com

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines– As part of the guidelines of the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), maps from the UP National Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project Noah) will be used as reference for acquiring permits and certifications for projects. 

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fmahar.lagmay%2Fposts%2F10155957125183354&width=500" width="500" height="707" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    All district engineers and construction division chiefs were ordered to make a list of no-build zones and submit this to the DPWH Central Office on December 10.

    The DPWH memorandum dated December 6 also said only projects which have complied with DPWH orders and national laws will be certified.

    No-build zones are areas where building of infrastructure, except critical facilities, should not be permitted because of their exposure to landslides, flooding, storm surges or other natural hazards. These are defined by the Water Code, Civil Code, Revised Forestry Code of the Philippines.

    Guidelines to DPWH’s required permits and certificates in building within potentially high-hazard areas now include using Project Noah maps as reference for hazards such as floods, rainfall-triggered landslides, and storm surges.

    Established in 2012, Project Noah was the government's flagship disaster management initiative under the Department of Science and Technology. It was discontinued in March 2017 due to "lack of funds" until UP adopted the program. Through its website and social media accounts, Project Noah provides high-resolution flood, landslide and storm surge hazard maps. (READ: How does Project NOAH contribute to PH’s disaster management?)

    Meanwhile, the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) will certify the suitability for construction of property.

    For earthquake and volcanic hazards, Phivolcs certification is necessary, with the consultation of its hazard maps.  (READ:12-point checklist for an earthquake-resistant house)

    “It is imperative for all planning and implementing offices of this Department to consult with the most updated Comprehensive Land Use Plans of concerned Local Government Units, with particular focus on the hydro-meteorological hazard maps and other human vulnerabilities,” DPWH said in its memorandum.

    As the engineering and infrastructure arm of the government, this is one of the DPWH’s effort to mainstream disaster risk reduction and climate change in its infrastructure planning. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines– After the 17th Congress approved the extension of martial law in Mindanao until the end of 2019, netizens were left wondering about the basis and necessity of the move.

    In a joint session on Wednesday, December 12, the Senate and the House of Representatives also approved the year-long suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus in the region, which allows the arrest of persons of interest without a warrant. 

    This third extension means Mindanao will be under martial law for a total of over two and a half years.

    House Majority Leader Rolando Andaya justified the extension as necessary to "enable the AFP, PNP, and all other law enforcement agencies to finally put an end to the rebellion, keep it from escalating to other parts of the country, and prevent a catastrophe similar to what happened in Marawi City.”

    Netizens pointed out that while martial law might have contributed to maintaining peace and order in the area especially following the Marawi siege in May 2017, the basis of the extension seemed questionable now, when that there was no clear threat to security.

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fposts%2F2376017412419028%3Fcomment_id%3D2376214465732656&include_parent=false" width="560" height="161" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fphotos%2Fa.317154781638645%2F2376126885741414%2F%3Ftype%3D3%26comment_id%3D2376131269074309&include_parent=false" width="560" height="181" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    Others wondered why people residing outside Mindanao were making a big deal out of the extension when things were business as usual in the region.

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fphotos%2Fa.317154781638645%2F2376126885741414%2F%3Ftype%3D3%26comment_id%3D2376130579074378&include_parent=false" width="560" height="161" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-cards="hidden" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It’s funny how this people who are not from Mindanao are against the Martial Law while people in Mindanao are enjoying it</p>&mdash; ʸ (@ryan_c_donato) <a href="https://twitter.com/ryan_c_donato/status/1072767586754949120?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    But there were also Mindanaoans who spoke up about how the martial law extension could possibly affect marginalized communites and those living in remote areas. Some people pointed out that this may possibly lead to greater repercussions when ignored.

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fposts%2F2376017412419028%3Fcomment_id%3D2376184575735645&include_parent=false" width="560" height="161" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

     {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">People out here trying to defend Martial Law in Mindanao because it &quot;does not harm&quot; them. Look how this society has made us into individualistic pigs. Sorry. So you mean to say just as long as you are okay, even if your neighbor&#39;s house is already burning, you&#39;re fine with it?</p>&mdash; Bea Sacdalan (@sacdalanbea) <a href="https://twitter.com/sacdalanbea/status/1072768459920965632?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source} 

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Shame on Mindanaoan legislators who fully support the extension of Martial Law in Mindanao! You have blatantly disrespected the rights of the disenfranchised constituents whom you claim to represent.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EndMartialLaw?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#EndMartialLaw</a><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NotoMartialLawExtension?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NotoMartialLawExtension</a></p>&mdash; BRIGHT ACHUETE (@kaisipangabitan) <a href="https://twitter.com/kaisipangabitan/status/1072705886072623105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-cards="hidden" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Okay lang ang Martial Law sa Mindanao? I am from Mindanao. I come from the more-privileged part of the society YET I CAN SEE AND HEAR AND FEEL the pain of the Lumad people being killed one by one every day.</p>&mdash; zhy (@zsaramaribianca) <a href="https://twitter.com/zsaramaribianca/status/1072723978563637248?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="tl" dir="ltr">&quot;Ano ba ang alam n&#39;yong mga taga-Luzon tungkol sa martial law sa Mindanao?&quot;<br><br>At ano rin ang alam ng mga kongresistang taga-Luzon at Visayas na bumoto ng yes sa martial law sa Mindanao?</p>&mdash; Hacksaw Jim Digong || Jay-r Trinidad (@Targrod) <a href="https://twitter.com/Targrod/status/1072764592806219776?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">&quot;Reklamo ka sa martial law sa Mindanao, hindi ka naman taga Mindanao&quot; is so myopic. Should we then prohibit OFWs from commenting about our country&#39;s affairs?<br><br>Also, I work in Mindanao.</p>&mdash; euvicness (@euvicferrer) <a href="https://twitter.com/euvicferrer/status/1072764683185082369?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    Here's what other people had to say about the matter:

    {source}<a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/rapplerdotcom/timelines/1072770721103851520?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">Martial law extension - Curated tweets by rapplerdotcom</a> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    – Rappler.com


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    Bookmark to watch at 4 PM

    MANILA, Philippines – The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) says private vehicles can enter the yellow lane marking the bus routes along EDSA 100 meters before the exit. But are the exits uniform in distance?

    Road safety advocate Vince Lazatin points out an existing problem concerning the bus lanes. Have you encountered this while driving? Watch this episode. – Rappler.com


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    BURST OF COLORS. The University of the Philippines lights up again with colorful lanterns for the 2018 UP Lantern Parade with artworks depicting social issues in the country. Photo by Maria Tan/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines  From strong calls to end all forms of violence to heartwarming messages, the 2018 University of the Philippines (UP) lantern parade shone a light on various issues through floats despite the rainy weather Friday, December 14, at the Quezon Hall Amphitheater.

    Following UP’s Christmas theme, “Paglaot, Pagdaong” (sailing out to sea, docking), academic units and student organizations made waves with their floats and displays.

    The UP School of Urban and Regional Planning anchored its float on family at the forefront of development, as it faced a brightly-lit metropolis. It won first place and a P50,000 cash prize. The Institute of Islamic Studies followed in 2nd place, with UP College of Arts and Literature in 3rd place.

    Among those participating in the lantern parade was the UP College of Home Economics float that featured balikbayan boxes filled with pasalubong, and a snippet of a heartbreaking message from an Overseas Filipino Worker: “Sorry, 'di ako uuwi ngayong Pasko.” (Sorry, I’m not going home this Christmas.)

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="tl" dir="ltr">LOOK: The UP College of Home Economics float features balikbayan boxes filled with pasalubong, and a snippet of a heartbreaking message from an OFW: “Sorry, di ako uuwi ngayong Pasko.” <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/UPLanternParade?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#UPLanternParade</a> <a href="https://t.co/UBeYuCEOqM">pic.twitter.com/UBeYuCEOqM</a></p>&mdash; Samantha Bagayas (@SamanthaBagayas) <a href="https://twitter.com/SamanthaBagayas/status/1073512928844939265?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 14, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    Other floats anchored their displays on bold statements that called to defend and demand for safe spaces in places they consider their homes. These could be seen from the College of Law’s “West Philippine Sea, atin ‘to” banner to UP Babaylan’s display of protest against all forms of violence.

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">How’s this for a different take on the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AtinTo?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AtinTo</a> chant? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/UPLanternParade?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#UPLanternParade</a> <a href="https://t.co/rg5accgMGd">pic.twitter.com/rg5accgMGd</a></p>&mdash; Samantha Bagayas (@SamanthaBagayas) <a href="https://twitter.com/SamanthaBagayas/status/1073518576592596993?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 14, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

     

    Ang higit na malalim na pakay ng lantern parade ay ang pagkakataon na magkaisa tayong lahat sa pagkilos at madama ang iisang pintig ng ating mga puso,” UP President Danilo Concepcion said. (The deeper purpose of the lantern parade is the opportunity for us to take action together and feel the single beat of our hearts.)

    Around 3,000 people attended the lantern parade, according to Chief Security Officer John S. Baroña.

    Here are photos by Maria Tan from the 96th UP lantern parade:

     

     

     Rappler.com


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    LIBRARY FOR ALL. Mang Nanie has turned his home into a public library

    MANILA, Philippines – Wearing a bright peach polo shirt and khaki pants, a smiling 66-year-old Hernando Guanlao welcomes visitors to his home which has become a haven for book lovers in his neighborhood.

    Located along a small alleyway in Makati, Mang Nanie's house is home to almost 2 million books. Unlike other public libraries, his library is "unstructured" when it comes to policies – it is open 24/7 and people can borrow an unlimited number of books. (READ: Thanks to netizen’s request, Cebu City library will be open 24/7)

    “Readers can take home as many books as they want,” he says.

    The books vary from fiction to nonfiction and a lot of reference books for students to use. 

    The senior doesn’t do card cataloguing nor does be maintain a database because for him, it would just be an additional job.

    Turning pages

    Mang Nanie started his library in 2000. The idea sprang from his contemplation of life after retirement as a government employee, and how he could honor the reading habit he inherited from his parents.

    “When I was young, my parents and my elders believed that the school will guide us and would give us wisdom," Mang Nanie says. "You'll have to learn how to read so you'll not get lost."

    Mang Nanie shares that he never thought that his collection of 50 books would grow to more than 2 million. 

    24/7 LIBRARY. Mang Nanie fixes the books in the shelf before library visitors arrive in his house in Makati City  

    Mang Nanie says he thought about putting up a librarywhen he saw piles of unused books in his house. He brought the books outside his house to see if people would borrow them, and they did. Eventually people with good hearts rewarded him with books. That’s when his collection grew.

    Mang Nanie says he doesn’t solicit for books. When there were not enough books left in his shelves, people knocked on his doors with boxes of books. “Somebody will walk in coming down from the streets bringing boxes. That’s volunteerism without attachment."

    Mang Nanie wants to dispatch 200 books per day. If that doesn’t happen, he would check his email to see who requests for books. He would also look for a place where children can readily access them.

    “Books are just there. They come and go. I don’t worry about the inventory,” he says.

    Empowering people

    Mang Nanie believes that many people still don’t have access to books.

    “People didn’t increase their reading because the books all have a price tag,” he says.

    Mang Nanie is motivated by the thought that he is helping other people by giving them free access to books. He says in the Philippines, many poor people consider education, much less reading books, as a luxury.

    When he was a student, he used to sell old books outside their house during summer vacation to help his parents fund his education.

    “Alam ko ‘yung hirap ng mga magulang ko para pag-aralin kaming 5 magkakapatid (I know what my parents had gone through just to send us 5 siblings to school)," he says.

    Mang Nanie says his library is his means of empowering those who can't afford to buy books.

    “When you know how to read, the more places you’ll go,” he said.

    In the Philippines, the 2017 National Book Development Board (NBDB) readership survey showed Filipinos barely know if there is a public library near their home.

    But the sad reality is that most barangays in the country don't  have a library. NBDB chairperson Neni Sta Romana Cruz said libraries are important in ensuring that all Filipinos have access to books. (READ: Filipinos barely know if there are libraries near their homes)

    Sta Romana Cruz suggested that local government units should consider allotting funds for the construction of libraries as social spaces and venues of learning for their residents.

    Future plans

    Asked about the future of his library, Mang Nanie shares his dream that more people will put up their own public libraries.

    “It will roll on, evolve into a higher dimension. So the circles will go on and on and spread [into] a bigger, bigger circle and that is the Filipino circle that’s so big. That’s my dream,” said Mang Nanie.

    Mang Nanie says he will maintain his library for as long as he can. As long as there are people who are willing to donate books, his mission continues.

    “How do you stop something if people are still willing to help?" – Rappler.com

     

    Video by Jeff Digma | Editing by Jaene Zaplan


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    POWER OF WORDS. The bangkang papel lantern took third place for for this year's best lantern contest. It featured poems, research and stories written by UP gradutes and faculty members. Photo by Jazmin Tremblay/Rappler

    Editor's Note: The jeepney lantern was originally attributed to the College of Science and Technology, which is not the correct name of the college. It has since been edited to properly attribute it to Agham Youth and the College of Science.

    MANILA, Philippines – The University of the Philippines' (UP) Christmas theme "Paglaot, Pagdaong” (sailing out to sea, docking) was the symbolic thread that connected most of the glowing lanterns that weaved their way along the university's academic oval on Friday, December 14, for this year's UP Lantern Parade. (IN PHOTOS: Despite the rain, UP Lantern Parade 2018 shines on)

    The Kamalayag sculpture by artist Toym Imao – the centerpiece of UP's Yuletide celebrations this year – is a combination of the voyaging spirit as depicted in a kumpit or a traditional boat overtaking waves, and the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the Oblation's presence at the UP Diliman campus. 

    Each lantern on display at the parade shared a story, while many lanterns became platforms to a larger message.

    The float of the Institute of Islamic Studies (IIS), for instance, featured a boat made from recyclable materials to illustrate the resourcefulness and strong movement of the people.

    The Bangka float won the second place at the UP Lantern Parade 2018 for their portrayal of cultures and stories of Mindanao communities. Photo by Samantha Bagayas/Rappler

    The committee behind the bangka (boat) was made up of families hailing from various tribes in Mindanao. They reused old water bottles, newspapers, and plastics to make their award-winning float.

    Women in headscarves and men in traditional Islamic clothing danced to the rhythm of their float’s engine the minute the parade kicked off.

    This year's platform and theme resonated with the IIS because they could showcase their "unique Islamic traditions" enmeshed with local folklore. The float inspired students and educators from Mindanao to fly in to Manila to literally lift up the lantern in pride.

    Meanwhile, the UP College of Arts and Letters came in third place for their bangkang papel (paper boat) float.

    POWER OF WORDS. The bangkang papel lantern took third place for for this year's best lantern contest. It featured poems, research and stories written by UP gradutes and faculty members. Photo by Jazmin Tremblay/Rappler

    "Bangkang papel is a metaphor for what we do. We communicate to the world by means of words, by means of our literary works, by means of our research," Assistant Professor Manuel Giron said.

    He added: "If you look a little bit closer at the boat, we expose the texts. Some of these texts were selected from the creative works from our faculty and graduates. You'll see poetry and stories."

    KING OF THE ROAD. An original construction of Agham Youth and the College of Science, they labeled their lantern RESIST€. Photo by Fatima Qureshi/Rappler

    One of the lanterns at the parade featured the country's "King of the Road," the jeepney. Mounted on the public utility vehicle was the neon-lit plaque that read "Resist! In masa we trust" (Resist! In the masses we trust) – designed by Agham Youth and the College of Science.

    Calls to action were written in both Tagalog and English tackling capitalism, imperialism, and mass displacement of indigenous communities, with the aim of highlighting the ongoing political repression under the Duterte administration.The RESIST lantern committee plans to continue the protest across colleges.

    END. One of the smaller lanterns from the League of Filipino Students holds up a sign that reads "End misogyny". Photo by Fatima Qureshi/Rappler

    The League of Filipino Students, a coalition of national democratic organizations, also created small lanterns that carried different political slogans.

    Jong Medrina, one of the longtime workers of the Sumifru Corporation that oversees Mindanao's banana plantations, participated in the parade to bring labor rights closer to students.

    "We're here to exhaust all means to strengthen our calls," Medrina said. "In Mindanao, our freedom to assemble has been taken from us."

    Passersby stopped to witness the "silent protest" attended by over 10 workers, student activists, and dissidents wrapped in white and red-stained plasters. – Rappler.com

    Fatima Qureshi is a Rappler intern and a full-time student pursuing a Master's in Journalism degree at the University of Hong Kong.

    Jazmin Tremblay is a Rappler intern and a recent graduate of Bachelor of Communication Studies program majoring in journalism from Macewan University, Canada.


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    MANILA, Philippines (3rd UPDATE) – The operations manager of Inquirer Digital Outdoor was found on Thursday, December 20, after she went missing for a few days.

    Angelica Katigbak Carreon, 
    Inquirer.net’s operations manager for digital outdoor, is now recuperating in a hospital, Inquirer.net quoted her family as saying.

    According to Inquirer.net, 32-year-old Carreon was last seen leaving her home in Mandaluyong City at around 2:30 pm on Saturday, December 15, for Cubao in Quezon City. She was wearing a shirt (color unknown), khaki shorts, rounded eyeglasses, green sling bag, and multicolor Vans shoes. 

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDonjie%2Fposts%2F10156165611185028&width=500" width="500" height="659" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    Inquirer.net said Carreon's family thanked their company's management, colleagues, friends, and media companies that helped locate her. 

    Both Inquirer.net and Carreon’s family did not provide additional details. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – The story of Hernando Guanlao, the 66-year-old man who turned his home into a public library has inspired many netizens. (READ: Beyond the pages: Man turns home into public library)

    Mang Nanie never thought that his collection of 50 books would grow to two million. People with good hearts, according to him, would knock on his door bringing boxes of books every time his shelves run out of books.

    “Books are just there. They come and go. I don’t worry about the inventory,” he said.

    Unlike the usual ones, Mang Nanie’s library has no rules. It is open 24/7 and people can take home whatever book they want. He doesn’t follow card cataloguing and database updating because for him, it would be an additional job.

    Mang Nanie believes that many people still don’t have access to books because of their prices.  He says many poor people consider education, much less reading books, a luxury.

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iyJNH3Bnlwk" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

    In the Philippines, the 2017 National Book Development Board (NBDB) readership survey showed Filipinos barely know if there's a public library near their home.

    But the sad reality is that most barangays in the country don't have a library. NBDB chairperson Neni Sta Romana Cruz said libraries are important in ensuring that all Filipinos have access to books. (READ: Filipinos barely know if there are libraries near their homes)

    Advocacy captures hearts online

    Netizens commended Mang Nanie for his advocacy of empowering people through books. Since Rappler published his story on Saturday, December 15, people have been asking how they can extend help to him. 

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">People like Mang Nanie are the true heroes</p>&mdash; Q (@FrancisSolideyt) <a href="https://twitter.com/FrancisSolideyt/status/1073827192512045056?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 15, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fmeysiidelapena%2Fposts%2F2120626537976254&width=500" width="500" height="491" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fhelloasiaradio%2Fposts%2F2211260452250510&width=500" width="500" height="535" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fposts%2F2386142638073172%3Fcomment_id%3D2386152188072217&include_parent=false" width="560" height="141" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    How can you help?

    Mang Nanie said he will maintain his library for as long as he can. As long as there are people who are willing to donate books, his mission continues. “How do you stop something if people are still willing to help?"

    You can help him by:

    Rappler.com

     

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – Netizens are taking to social media to demand accountability from Ateneo de Manila University (ADMU) over the video of a bullying incident that went viral on Thursday, December 20.

    On Friday, December 21, the hashtag #NeverTolerateBullying trended on Twitter as netizens called on the academic institution to act swiftly and decisively over the serious incidents of bullying which Ateneo de Manila Junior High School (AJHS) initially described as a “fighting video.” 

    "The Ateneo Junior High School is dealing with this matter seriously beginning with an immediate investigation that ensued the moment the report reached us," AJHS said in a statement.

    Netizens, however, criticized the way AJHS downplayed the bullying by calling it a mere fighting incident.

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Wow. So apparently, ateneo is downplaying the incident as a video of children &quot;fighting&quot; not bullying. OMG<br>✔️imbalance of power<br>✔️intentional harm inflicted<br>✔️repetitive</p>&mdash; Agatha Dizon (@AgotNotIsidro) <a href="https://twitter.com/AgotNotIsidro/status/1075815637040037888?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 20, 2018</a></blockquote>

    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

    'End cycle of bullying'

    In a separate statement, ADMU president Fr Jose Ramon Villarin SJ gave his assurance that the school is "treating the matter with the highest priority and urgency."

    "Let me be very clear: the school does not condone such behavior. We have our codified standards of conduct and all students are made aware of these and their rights and responsibilities," Villarin said.

    He also appealed to everyone to be "mindful of consequences spiraling out of control when specific videos and comments are shared on social media." 

    Online, some netizens are also calling out others who have resorted to bullying the AJHS student who was identified in the video. (READ: These Filipino high school kids are out to end bullying)  

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Again, how does bullying the bully end the cycle of bullying?<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NeverTolerateBullying?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NeverTolerateBullying</a></p>&mdash; Camillo (@yogon) <a href="https://twitter.com/yogon/status/1075909028285272064?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 21, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">1st, never tolerate bullying. Second, if u are fighting for what is right, do it correctly. Cursing the bully doesn’t mean you are protecting the victims. You are also bullying by giving unnecessary comments on social media. Cyber bullying is also a crime.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NeverTolerateBullying?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NeverTolerateBullying</a></p>&mdash; ✈️ (@itsmwflyyyeerr) <a href="https://twitter.com/itsmwflyyyeerr/status/1075915899276652544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 21, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

     

    Check out the #NeverTolerateBullying online conversation below: 

    {source}

    <a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/MovePH/timelines/1075904419080724480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">Ateneo bullying - Curated tweets by MovePH</a> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

     

    {/source}

    What are your thoughts on this issue? How do you think should the academic institution address this bullying incident? – Rappler.com 

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – When people came across videos showing an Ateneo de Manila Junior High School student bullying his peers, there was demand for swift action on the matter.

    Parents wondered aloud about the safety of their children in what most would deem their second home, as students spend most of their time in school. Online, this is among the top questions: What should you do if your child is being bullied?

    According to the National Baseline Study on Violence Against Children, 3 out of 5 Filipino children have experienced peer violence in the form of bullying. It is a serious matter that should be addressed not just by schools, but also by families and communities.

    Here are 3 pieces of advice from parents who spoke from their own experiences of dealing with the bullying that their children faced:

    1. Be observant.

    Not all children might immediately share their experiences of being bullied. That's why parents must also be conscious of changes in their children's behavior.

    Macy Asupan, the president and chief executive officer of Trainings and Beyond Training Consultancy Services, noticed that her son was going through something when he started to act differently.

    "Be conscious of even just the minimal change in your child's behavior. Bullying is progressive. Sometimes, emotional bullying is more difficult to figure out," Asupan said.

    "Make it a habit to talk to your child everyday. Ask about their classmates, who they are, what do they do. Parents can get clues as to how their children relate to their classmates through those talks," she added. 

    2. Listen.

    When children finally do open up about bullying, it's important for parents to listen and understand.

    "What I can advise parents of kids who are being bullied at school is to never ignore it, especially if your child tells you about being bullied and asks for your help," said Berlin Flores, a 36-year-old local disaster risk reduction and management officer.

    His two children, a Grade 4 student at Ilaya Elementary School and a student at Tanay National High School, received threats of physical harm and verbal intimidation. In the case of his high school daughter, the habitual bully was found to come from a troubled family, who used her hostile attitude as a "form of rebellion."

    Both his children, especially his son, went to him for help. "My son would immediately tell me about such incidents, to which I would find time off from work to talk with their teacher or adviser and to come face to face with the bullies."

    Flores emphasized the importance of being open and understanding, especially since bullying is a sensitive matter. "Your child would most likely keep secret further cases of bullying if he or she feels that you are not responsive to such call for help. Don't let your child think or feel that way," he said.

    One way that children can feel that they are being heard is when something is being done about their situation. Flores advised finding time to talk to the bully in a calm and civilized manner. "And please, do it as soon as possible," he added. (READ: What I wish happened when I got bullied)

    3. Consult with school authorities.

    When confrontation doesn't seem like the best course of action, meeting with school authorities may help.

    "With the help of the adviser or school guidance counselor, ask for an audience with the bully's parents or guardians, so you can find common ground to resolve the problem together. It's vital to do this in the presence of both parties, since a one-sided resolution to the problem would most likely be unfruitful," said Flores.

    There are laws and regulations that schools must comply with to ensure robust anti-bullying policies in public and private preschool, elementary, and secondary schools. The Department of Education Child Protection Policy (DepEd Order No. 40, series 2012), for example, orders the creation of child protection committees in all public and private schools.

    The implementing rules and regulations of the Anti-Bullying Act of 2013 also require all public and private schools to submit a copy of their child protection or anti-bullying policy to the division office. (READ: The road to a bully-free Philippines)

    These ensure that reports of bullying to parents, teachers, and other appropriate authorities would be treated with confidentiality.

    When Asupan's son with autism spectrum disorder was bullied in a regular kindergarten class at Ateneo de Davao University, she immediately consulted school authorities.

    Even with a teacher and a teacher aide overseeing the class, her son got hit by a classmate. "Because it was not easy to get the full version, I did not react right away," Asupan said.

    Since the complaints were consistent, Asupan set a meeting with teachers and the bully's parents, who didn't attend and later remarked, "Baka naman naglalaro lang." (Maybe they're just playing.)

    The experience underscored the role that teachers and parents play in resolving and preventing bullying. "We can never predict how bullies will be triggered and teachers can greatly help in mitigating potential dangers. Parents are critical in embedding good behavior and [a] proactive stance against bullying," Asupan explained.

    Although all schools are required to have an anti-bullying policy, implementation may also be poor, leading to the occurrence of these incidents.

    Asupan's advice: "More than a paper policy, schools must develop sustainable programs that will embed good values such as care, embracing diversity and inclusion, social responsibility. These values promote respect to others. Teach children how to say no to bullying and provide a safe environment where bullying can be reported and bullies can be properly sanctioned." – Rappler.com 


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    MANILA, Philippines – If 2018 were a movie, then one of its greatest adversaries would have been a character called “fake news.”

    Technology and social media have, unfortunately, made spreading lies and disinformation online with so much ease. (READ: More Filipinos aware of fake news on social media – Pulse Asia)

    The spread of false information in the Philippines started during the 2016 presidential election through fake accounts. They sowed anger by seeding timelines with revisionist narratives of history and misleading memes. The weaponization of the internet and social media took off after President Rodrigo Duterte's election, using hate to incite violence against perceived critics of the drug war and the government. Two years later, "patriotic trolling" shows no signs of stopping. (WATCH: 'Fake news' and the dilemma it has created)

    But there is a silver lining in this situation: in 2018, various groups and individuals banded together for the sole purpose of fighting fake news.

    Partnerships 

    Several media groups worked on various initiatives this year to address the threats that online disinformation posed to media and democracy.

    From an annual forum of media leaders, Media Nation morphed into a collaboration toward fighting disinformation, improving media literacy, and protecting press freedom.

    In January, the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines led several groups in staging Black Friday protests, initially as a response to the order of the Securities and Exchange Commissions (SEC) to revoke Rappler’s license for allegedly violating the Constitution and Anti-Dummy Law – a move considered as a major blow to press freedom. (TIMELINE: The case of Rappler’s SEC registration)

    Rappler, the Philippine Daily Inquirer, the ABS-CBN News Channel (ANC), VERA Files, the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility, Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle Philippines, the University of the Philippines, BlogWatch, Media Nation, Citizen Safe, Foundation for Media Alternatives, and the Friedrich Naumann Foundation also organized a forum called Democracy and Disinformation in February to raise awareness on the state of democracy and the problem of disinformation in the country. 

    ANC, CMFR, NUJP, PCIJ, Rappler, and the SunStar group also celebrated World Press Freedom Day by launching an animated video that encourages people to read more, listen more, and consume news from diverse sources.

    Meanwhile, the Unesco-led global campaigns #25SecondsForPressFreedom for World Press Freedom Day, and #ThruthNeverDies for World Impunity Day emphasized the importance of the press in the pursuit of truth. (WATCH: When Philippine media is threatened)

    Roadshows

    Student journalists and different communities also pledged to fight lies and disinformation in their own individual ways.

    MovePH, Rappler’s civic engagement arm, organized several roadshows in Laguna, Cebu, Cagayan de Oro, and Eastern Visayas to promote the conversation on using social media for social good and train volunteers and student journalists on fact-checking.

    At the #MoveCebu: Social Good in the Digital Age forum and workshop, students of the University of San Carlos (USC) in Cebu City pledged to fight disinformation. They not only promised to check their sources before sharing online posts, they also pledged to stay engaged online. (READ: USC students pledge to fight disinformation, defend press freedom)

    MovePH also organized two bootcamp events at the Rappler headquarters in May and December for campus journalists who are interested in becoming volunteer fact-checkers.

    In one of these events, they shared why press freedom mattered to them.

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    The Democracy and Disinformation consortium also organized a series of roadshows and held its first events in the provinces of Cebu and Pampanga. The events tackled the role of the media and the problems we face on democracy and disinformation, and taught the public what they can do to be part of the solution.

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fvideos%2F258083298390580%2F&show_text=1&width=560" width="560" height="426" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>{/source}

    Reporting fake ‘news’

    Civic engagement did not end with pledges during the workshops.

    Online, volunteers and netizens reported and flagged Facebook links and posts they believed to be spreading fake news. They reported these posts in a Facebook group called Fact-checking in the Philippines, a platform where fact-checking advocates could "gather to discuss the disinformation problem and what we can do about it." 

    With the help of the community, Rappler's external fact-check efforts produced almost 200 explainers. Below are some of our fact-check stories that started from reports sent to us through email or Facebook.

    Do you want to be part of the MovePH network? Sign up here! – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – An unsuspecting family living at the alleged address of the Ateneo bully was caught in the middle of the mess, as thousands of pesos worth of deliveries wrongly ended up at their home.

    As the bullying controversy blew up on social media, so did speculations and false information.

    While many called for swift action from the school administration, some took matters into their own hands by putting the alleged address of the bully in comment sections online.

    Others were all too quick to believe that this was indeed the bully's address. Deliveries were sent to the address as a form of revenge – to make him and his family pay. But the address later turned out to belong to a school, chapel, and home of a senior pastor and his family.

    Since Friday, December 21, fast-food deliveries worth P7,000 have reached Jewel Taculod, the daughter of the senior pastor, and her family.

    Taculod is now appealing to the public to stop sharing her address, as their family is in no way connected to the Ateneo student.

    "The address posted in the comment section...is not legitimately his! Please be responsible [with the] posts you're sharing!  May pamilya kayong naapektuhan, na walang kamalay-malay sa issue (You're affecting a family that is not involved in the issue whatsoever)!" she said on Facebook.

    There were also pending orders worth P37,000 and P17,000 sent to the address through online shopping site Lazada. According to Taculod, they were not approved for delivery since calls for confirmation went unanswered. She later pleaded with Lazada to block all deliveries sent to their address under the name of the bully.

    Aside from the deliveries, they've noticed more people passing by their place.

    "Maraming dumadaan sa amin. Kaya nagpost kami ng papel," Taculod said. (A lot of people pass by our home. So we posted a piece of paper.)

    On that piece of paper, they wrote:

    "This is NOT the house of [the bully] or their family. Any delivery in that name, please return to sender. You are a victim of FAKE NEWS. - the real owners"

    "First time nangyari ito sa amin – 'yung hindi ka makatulog kasi baka may dumating na unexpected. We are feeling unsafe now na kalat sa social media ang address namin," Taculod said.

    (This is the first time this has happened to us – we can't sleep because something unexpected might arrive. We are feeling unsafe now because our address is being spread on social media.)

    Taculod's family also called for prayers for all victims of bullying. (READ: What you can do if your child is being bullied)

    Ateneo has announced that it dismissed the student caught bullying his peers. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – In 2018, we saw how disinformation online spread like wildfire. We witnessed how digital platforms are being used to undermine and weaken our democracy.

    Trolls have dominated the online landscape and affected public discourse. But despite the hateful comments and messages, we've also seen hope in people whose stories inspire courage and resilience online.

    These stories have enabled our communities to see beyond the tough situations and hatred, with hope and optimism moving them to take action.

    This year, in 2018, MovePH went around the Philippines to help tell the inspiring stories of the voiceless.

    Hardworking lolo, lola in Los Baños

    The story of Rene, 82, and Aida Mojado, 76, is proof that a strong relationship can make challenges bearable. (READ: WATCH: Meet hardworking lolo, lola in Los Baños)

    Despite their age, they traverse a busy road in the University of the Philippines in Los Baños to earn a living.

    Aida said she accompanies Rene on his trips because she feels bad whenever he drives alone.

    Not surprisingly, their story has touched the UPLB community as an example of a relationship that shows "may forever" (forever exists).

    According to Aida, they've only earned an average of P700 a day since the start of the year. They used to earn as much as P1,000 a day last year, when fuel prices were lower.

    But with the rising prices of crude oil in the global market and the Philippines' tax reform law, consumers like Rene and Aida have been adversely affected.

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6v8tzn7ZBWQ" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

    'Sponge boy'

    The story of Melvin Chua, 22, is one about triumph over poverty. The young boy whom his relatives almost gave away to adoptive parents worked hard to become the family breadwinner. (READ: 'Sponge boy': 13 years of selling dish cleaners pays off)

    Chua fondly recalled how his customers bought his sponges so he could stop for a few hours and join a birthday celebration.

    "Talaga pong pinakanta nila ako, pinakain po nila ako, and then pag-uwi ko po sa bahay ay may dala dala na akong mga handa (I sang and I ate with them. They even packed food for my family)," Chua told Rappler.

    Melvin did not abandon his studies despite the toll of being the breadwinner. He adjusted to the school schedule. He sold his dish sponges in the afternoon when his classes were in the morning and vice versa.

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BAJJho8sDEk" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

    Man turns home into public library

    The story of Hernando Guanlao, the 66-year-old man who turned his home into a public library has inspired many netizens.

    Mang Nanie never thought that his collection of 50 books would grow to two million. People with good hearts, according to him, would knock on his door bringing boxes of books every time his shelves ran out of books.

    Unlike the usual ones, Mang Nanie’s library has no rules. It is open 24/7 and people can take home whatever book they want. He doesn’t follow card cataloguing and database updating because for him, these would be an additional job.

    Mang Nanie believes that many people still don’t have access to books because of their prices. He says many poor people consider education, much less reading books, a luxury.

    “When you know how to read, the more places you’ll go,” he said.

    Here’s how you can help him continue his mission of empowering people through books.

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iyJNH3Bnlwk" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

    Ed Sarao of the Sarao jeepney business

    Philippine roads are not complete without the jeepney.

    For Ed Sarao, the heir to the Sarao Motors business – one of the pioneers of the jeepney manufacturing industry – jeepneys serve as the “blood of the city.”

    According to Ed, the jeepney has served as a melting pot of sorts for the community, where neighbors sit beside each other and strangers make the effort to help pass passenger fare from one end to another.

    He is now ready for the challenge of modernizing one of the main modes of transportation in the Philippines. (LOOK: New jeepneys under PUV modernization program)

    Ed, however, is appealing to the government and the people to be easy on the industry. (READ: Is the PUV modernization program 'anti-poor?')

    "I think that 3-year plan nila about phasing out or upgrading, parang kulang eh. They should extend it to probably 5 or 10 years.... Dapat tingnan din nila siguro somewhere in the middle magkakaroon 'yan ng agreement na maganda," he said.

    (I think their 3-year plan for phasing out or upgrading is too short. They should extend it to probably 5 or 10 years....They should look at a compromise to come up with a good agreement.)

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DuqohRzZD34" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

    Cebu Skateboarding

    In the Philippines, skateboarding has not received as much attention as other sports. (READ: WATCH: How Cebu's skateboarders are fighting for their own space)

    In Cebu City, however, the local skateboarding community has racked up around 3,000 members. Despite the growing number, Angelo Talago, 33, said they continue to struggle with getting both government support and public acceptance.

    In the evenings, Talago and his friends would go around the city on their skateboards. He would often be accompanied by 23-year-old college student Anthony Dorot, who started skateboarding when he was still in high school.

    The feeling of freedom brought by skateboarding is often fleeting, as authorities would chase them and drive them away. Talago laments the absence of a public skate park where they can practice for free. This is why they've been forced to use the streets.

    Fortunately, things appear to be slowly changing for the better, after Cebuana skateboarder Margielyn Didal bagged a gold medal in the 2018 Asian Games.

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EOdxAsJntxU" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source}

     – Rappler.com

     


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