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    Screenshot from Ianna Reyes' video

    MANILA, Philippines – To many, mention El Nido, Palawan, and what comes to their mind is a picture of pristine islands, blue skies and clear seas. This is not the sight that welcomed Filipino tourist Ianna Reyes, however, during her visit at the Secret Lagoon on Thursday, August 16. 

    An overwhelming heap of trash, mostly plastic bottles and wrappers, were seen floating around the small lagoon in the video taken by Reyes.  

    In a Facebook message, Reyes told Rappler that her post was not intended to harm the province's tourism industry. Instead, she wanted to challenge the public to be mindful of where they throw their garbage every time they visit tourist places like Palawan. 

    “The post wasn’t to harm the booming tourism in Palawan but to help raise awareness that we should be mindful of where we throw our garbage or else, it will come bite us back in the places we least expect it to be,” Reyes said.

    As of posting, the video garnered 22,000 reactions and was shared over 23,000 times.

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    In a radio interview, municipal administrator Rene Jay Dela Calzada said that the Secret Lagoon is located in the outer portion of the islands. Calzada also explained that this was not a case of tourists leaving their trash in the area because it was not the designated place for picnic and rest. He claimed that garbage from nearby provinces may have washed up to their province due to the monsoon. 

    "Alam natin na kapag may malakas na daloy ng hangin at waves, yung mga basura galing sa laot ay pumapasok sa public bay," he said. 

    (We know for a fact that when there are strong winds and rain, the trash from the oceans would wash ashore into our public bay) 

    This was echoed by netizens in the comments section, explaining that the province has implemented a ban on plastics  and conducts regular clean up drives as part of the local government's tourism policy.

    {source}

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    {/source} 

    The video also served as a reminder of the heaps of garbage that washed up along Roxas Boulevard after monsoon rains and strong winds hit Metro Manila. (READ: Monsoon dumps over half of August rainfall in just 1 day)

    {source}<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8MwATK40SRU" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>{/source} 

     

    Earlier in January 2018, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources implemented several policies to regulate tourism in the Palawan. 

    The Protected Area Management Board of El Nido-Taytay Protected Area passed a resolution, limiting the tourist entry and activity in the 3 most visited places in El Nido which are the Small Lagoon, Big Lagoon, and the Secret Beach. 

    The PAMB also closed Helicopter Island, Balinaud Beach, Turtle Island, Pacanayan Islands, among other areas which are identified with high biodiversity value. – with a report from Abigail Abigan/Rappler.com


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    HEARTBREAKING. Bedridden father walks her daughter, Charlotte Gay N. Villarin, down the aisle on August 9, 2018. Photo from Law Tapalla Photography Facebook page

    MANILA, Philippines – A dying father’s last wish became a heartbreaking scene for netizens.

    All the 65-year-old, cancer-stricken Pedro Villarin wanted was to be able to walk his daughter, Charlotte Villarin, down the aisle on her wedding day last August 9. 

    Despite being diagnosed with advanced liver cancer, Pedro got his wish. Then Pedro passed away on August 12.

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    Charlotte told Rappler it was only on June 16 that they learned about her father's condition. He was rushed to the emergency room and admitted to the hospital that day.

    "Medyo okay pa siya noon. Then habang tumatagal, palala ng palala yung pain na nararamdaman nya," Charlotte said. (He looked okay then but as time went by his pain got worse.)

    According to Charlotte, the original plan was to have the wedding in December this year. But when her father was in the hospital, he convinced them to move  the wedding date to August. 

    "Sabi niya sa akin magpakasal na kami. Magpakasal na daw kami kasi gusto niya malakad ako sa altar. At first, hindi namin alam kung kaya kasi one month preparation lang," shared Charlotte. (He told me to push through with the wedding immediately because he wanted to walk me down the aisle. At first, we were not sure if we could push through since we only had one month of preparation.)

    A wedding photo posted by Law Tapalla Photography captioned "A Father's Love ❤️" quickly went viral moving netizens to tears. As of this writing, it has 15,000 shares and 22,000 reactions.

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    Frank Franco shared that the father's endless love was all he could give to his daughter on her wedding day. The same sentiment was shared by Aying Jomuad Babas, saying that a parent's love is priceless. 

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    If given a chance to talk again to her father, Charlotte said she would thank her Papu for the love and sacrifices. She would also tell him that he is the best father any daughter could have.

    "'Yung pagmamahal mo, hindi lang ako ang nakakaramdam ngayon, but a lot of people. Madami ang naiinspire sa 'yo. Salamat sa pagtitiis sa lahat ng sakit. Salamat dahil sa huli mong sandali, AKO PA DIN YUNG INISIP MO. I love you Papu and I will miss you forever!

    (Your love has been felt by a lot of people. You've become an inspiration. Thank you, for all your sacrifices. Thank you, because at the last moments of your life, you thought of me. I love you, Papu and I will miss you forever!) – Rappler.com 

     

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – In the face of major disasters, we've gotten to used to resiliency being touted as the Filipino spirit persevering and staying positive.

    Is resiliency enough? How do we create a truly resilient Philippines? (READ: The problem with Filipino resilience)

    Rappler, in partnership with Tuklas Innovation Labs, will host a roundtable discussion titled, "#ResilientPH: Lessons from the ground on disaster preparedness."

    It will highlight the learnings and experiences of innovators, humanitarian workers, and people involved in disaster preparedness.

    Our panel will include:

    • Silvestre Barrameda Jr, local governance and training division officer in charge of the Local Government Academy
    • Thelma Vecina, officer in charge of the Local Government Academy
    • Alysa Curioso, community partner of Ligtas Pad 
    • Heidrun Milan, Tuklas innovator of the Bakwit Kit
    • Enan Melencio, consortium manager of Tuklas Innovation Labs

    Rappler's Aika Rey will moderate the roundtable discussion.

    "#ResilientPH: Lessons from the Ground on Disaster Preparedness" will set the tone for the Resilience Marketplace for Innovation Forum on August 23. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines (UPDATED) – Four days after a Xiamen Air plane skidded off Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) international runway 06/24, thousands of passengers – mostly overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) – were still dealing with cancelled or delayed flights on Monday, August 20.

    But the OFWs, who were either flying home or returning to the countries of employment, faced not just the trouble of getting on plane. There's the risk of them losing their overseas jobs if they didn't get to their employers on time, said advocacy group Migrante. 

    "The NAIA runway closure...presents a grave impact on the job security of affected OFWs. What the authorities failed to give weight to is that many of those OFWs who were caught in the NAIA mishap will face possible termination," said Migrante in a statement on Monday. 

    Airport authorities reopened the NAIA runway late Saturday night, August 18, some 36 hours after the accident Thursday. However, the domino effect – cancelled, diverted, and delayed flights– was still being felt in airports in Manila and abroad 4 days later, with many stranded passengers comparing NAIA to an evacuation center.  

    "This is reflective of the government's inefficiency and lack of readiness to respond to minor airport woes at a time when it is flaunting its 'Build, Build, Build' infrastructure program," Migrante said. 

    The advocacy group for OFW welfare also said a public apology for the accident is not enough, and responsible parties should pay up. 

    "A public apology will not suffice if those behind the NAIA blunder will not be held responsible and the distressed OFW passengers are not compensated for the aggravation they endured and consequently will go through," Migrante said. 

    Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) Administrator Hans Leo Cacdac said in a Sunday interview with ANC that the government agency is assisting affected OFWs at the airport by providing their immediate needs on the ground. 

    "We are all hands on deck.... The flights have normalized in general.  It's just that we have to address those whose flights have been cancelled last Friday and Saturday," Cacdac said.

    Manila International Airport Authority General Manager Ed Monreal also said they are willing to provide OFWs certification about the flight delay so they can show something to their employers as proof. 

    The Department of Foreign Affairs said on Monday it would direct Philippine embassies to issue certifications that OFWs can present to their employers to prove the valid reason for their delayed return. 

    Below are some comments of netizens days after the NAIA mishap.  

    {source}

    <a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/MovePH/timelines/1031436905592774656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 days after NAIA mishap - Curated tweets by MovePH</a> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> 

    {/source}

    Rappler.com 


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    DOST Undersecretary for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Renato Solidum weighs in on the viral "resilience" photo on August 23, 2018.

    MANILA, Philippines – For Department of Science and Technology Undersecretary Renato Solidum, there's a mistmatch in the appreciation of resilience as a trait of the Filipino and what it means in times of disaster.

    Solidum, on the sidelines of the Resilience Marketplace for Innovation forum held at the MOA SMX Covention Center on August 23, weighed in on the viral "resilience" photo of a local news organization that sparked online discussions on the Filipino's understanding of the word. (READ: Has resiliency been used as an excuse for government shortcomings?)

    Solidum told Rappler that Filipinos are resilient in character but the Philippines itself is not a "resilient community" yet.

    "If you look at the definition of what is a resilient community, then we are not there yet. Because in a [disaster]-resilient community, we are able either to prevent, absorb, resist, or lessen the impact [of disasters] and being able to recover the different social and economic infrastructures," added Solidum.

    Solidum explained, "If we compare the description of the man wading through the flood with a smile that has the correct resilience in character or spirit but that spirit for us must be converted into real action." The viral photo of a man wading through a flood went viral on August 11 when Metro Manila and nearby provinces experienced heavy downpour and widespread flooding

    Disaster-resilient community

    According to Solidum, a community can be labeled disaster-resilient if they are:  

    1. Able to recover from losses brought by disasters;

    2. Able to efficiently and effectively respond to the risks or hazards that are occurring; and

    3. Able to recover and build better from the impacts brought by disasters. 

    The forum, organized by the Local Government Academy of the Department of the Interior and Local Government, was attended by more than a thousand responders, decision-makers, and advocates of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. – Rappler.com


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    GRADUATES. Inmates from the municipality of Consolacion in Cebu graduates from the education department's Alternative Learning System on August 20. Photo from Councilor Joannes Alegado

    MANILA, Philippines –  It's never too late to start again.

    A heartwarming video went viral this week featuring inmates from Consolacion, Cebu singing Orient Pearl's "Pagsubok" during their graduation rites.

    "Laban lang (Just fight)," Consolacion Councilor Joannes Alegado wrote in the caption of the video which already has 1.3 million views and 21,000 shares as of this posting.

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    In an interview with Rappler, Alegado said 14 elementary and 20 high school students of the Consolacion Municipal Jail graduated from the education department's Alternative Learning System last Monday.

    Asked for his message to the graduates, Alegado said: "I told them to persevere and not to lose hope. I look forward [to] the day that we will meet once again outside the jail premises and see them succeed."

    He also advised other inmates to start thinking about what they want to do with their lives and their future. 

    "It's never too late. As long as you have the grit, then everything will be possible," Alegado added. Rappler.com 


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    MANILA, Philippines–How do you use social media for social good?

    With the rise of digital technology, there are now various platforms that allow everyone to have a voice and join the conversation.

    This, however, has also resulted in the phenomenal rise of fake accounts, hate groups, and disinformation. For instance, Rappler's propaganda war series discusses how social media has been weaponized, and reality manufactured, online:

    This brings up a much needed dilemma that deserves attention: how do you fact check or verify online content?

    “#MoveCDO: Social Good in the Digital Age” will draw in around 300 campus journalists, students, and media practitioners interested to learn how we can move the Philippines one story at a time.

    At a time when society is deeply seated in the digital sphere, it helps to find out what can be done to see through the noise and make sense of information on social media.

    The forum is organized by Rappler in partnership with the Development Communication Society and Development Communication Department of Xavier University-Ateneo de Cagayan.

    “#MoveCDO: Social Good in the Digital Age” will be held on September 6 at the Little Theater in XU. The program starts at 8am.

    Tickets to the forum are free but seats are limited. Register below to secure your tickets now.

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    Here is the program:

    Time Activity
    8:15 - 9:00 am

    Registration

    9:00 - 9:15 am

     

    Welcome remarks

    9:15 - 9:30 am

     

    Discussion: Getting to know you/Levelling off activity

    9:30 - 10:15 am

     

    Power of social media: Using technology for social good
    Chay Hofileña
    Investigative Head, Rappler

     

    10:15 - 10:45 am

    Discussion: Digital media etiquette

    10:45 - 11:15 am

     

    Responsible use of digital media

    Stacy de Jesus
    Head, MovePH and Digital Communications, Rappler

    11:15 - 11:45 am

     

    Panel discussion: Why facts matter


    Moderated by:

    Raisa Serafica
    Unit Head of Civic Engagement, Rappler

     

    11:45 - 12:00 pm

     

     

    Synthesis

    The forum aims to bring in interested participants to take part in discussions that will help form an understanding of the nature of digital platforms, and spark a conversation around opportunities and threats to journalism and democracy.

    Explaining the nature of disinformation online, the forum spotlights everybody’s role in pushing for a free and independent press to preserve democracy.

    The forum will be followed by a workshop on online fact-checking and verification.

    Time Activity
    1:00 - 1:30 pm

    Welcome remarks

    1:30 - 2:00 pm

    Group Dynamics: Icebreaker/Getting-to-know-you activity

     

    2:00 - 2:45 pm

     

    Session I: Fact check 101 

    2:45 - 3:15 am

     

    Session II: Harnessing social media for civic engagement

    3:15 - 4:00 pm

    Fact checking excercises

    -Agos: Fact check in humanitarian/disaster scenario
    -Spot check: An excercise in fact checking online content
    -Using X: Internal fact checking in story telling

    4:00 - 4:15 pm

     

    Call to Action: Be a Mover

    Stacy de Jesus
    Head, MovePH and Digital Communications, Rappler

    Make sure to sign up soon! – Rappler.com

    Rappler sustains its fact-check efforts with support from Facebook's Third Party Fact Checker Program, our crowdfunding donors, Friedrich Naumann Foundation (FNF) and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).


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    MANILA, Philippines – We often look for ways to stay relevant in this tech-driven world. But what we sometimes don't realize is that the answer to this already lies in our core.

    Technology is here to augment human skills, not replace them.

    As we evolve, how do we apply our new skills in creating the change we want – and need – to see in ourselves and the world?

    For the first of our series of #ThinkPH roundtable discussions, we explore the question: Who are you in the time of creative destruction?

    Joining us are the following thought leaders:

    Tune in to facebook.com/rapplerdotcom on September 4, Tuesday, 4 pm for the livestream. – Rappler.com

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – For drug users in rehabilitation, only one narrative seems acceptable in Philippine society: if you use drugs, then stop.

    However, abstinence actually isn’t the only option for drug rehabilitation. In NoBoxTransitions’ forum held on Monday, August 6, Dr. Andrew Tatarsky shared abstinence may be the best outcome for individuals undergoing drug rehabilitation but it’s definitely not the only outcome.

    “We don’t have to dismantle our traditional treatments but extending our reach enables us to engage people in the early stage,” he said.

    He discussed how the abstinence-only model may stop drug users from getting treatment since it does not seem appealing or realistic to them.

    “Doing more of the same thing isn’t working as well as we would like to. [...] Why are we so limited in our ability to be helpful to the overwhelming problem of alcohol abuse and substance addiction?” asked Dr. Tatarsky.

    Using the abstinence-only model for drug rehabilitation hasn’t been the most effective.

    According to Dr. Benjamin Reyes of the Dangerous Drugs Board, only 200,000 out of 1.6 million surrunderers were engaged in rehabilitation since the drug war started. (READ: PNP: No reason to fear return to ‘chilling’ drug war)

    “We have been so brutal to drug users and their community in the hope of deterring people [to use drugs]. I believe it’s coming from a good place, but it hasn’t worked,” said Dr. Tatarsky.

    During the forum, Dr. Tatarsky introduced the concept of harm reduction practices reflecting compassionate pragmatism as viable treatment options for drug users.

    “Harm reduction allows to ask people the question of how to get people from where they are to where they want to be. [...] If we make an offer to people that they aren’t ready for, it’s unlikely that they’ll accept them,” shared Dr. Tatarsky.

    He explained that harm reduction embodies compassionate pragmatism because it provides evidence-based programs that are delivered with acceptance of the user. This means to provide treatment services that are patterned according to the person’s capability and end goal. It shifts the attention from abstinence to a reduction of drug-related harm. It focuses on starting where the person is and making small incremental changes toward reduced risk. This is how most complex behaviors change.

    “The harm reduction model allows us to partner with people toward the greatest reduction of harm, which may be non-problematic use or may be abstinence. [...] Most problematic drug users at the point that they become concerned about their use are not ready, able, or willing to start stopping. But we can start from there.”

    Dr. Tatarsky added harm reduction treatments embodying compassionate pragmatism extends the reach of rehabilitation as they bridge care for drug users in varying stages of readiness to change.

    “Rather than scare tactics, we tell people the real dangers of drugs. When we don’t know the doses or other dangers, we need to give people the tools to make the right decisions. Empowering people with information, skills, and strategies to stay safe,” said Dr. Tatarsky.

    Compassionate pragmatism in harm reduction practices helps make an offer that speaks to their needs and engages them in the process and collaborate with them in solving the problem.

    Dr. Tatarsky presented harm reduction practices that could be applied in rehabilitating drug users such as enhancing self-regulation skills, practicing urge-surfing, joining group therapies, taking part in physical activities such as exercise and self-care, and focusing on personal relationships. Other activities can also be used to help rehabilitate drug users. (READ: Theater therapy heals widows, orphans of drug war victims)

    NoBox Transitions’ forum titled “Conversations with Dr. Andrew Tatarsky: Extending Our Reach Through Compassionate Pragmatism” is one of its initiatives to present scientifically demonstrable responses to help those in need. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – You can help Lumad students finish their college degrees by donating books.

    In its bid to secure a permit to operate a college, the Community Technical College of Southeastern Mindanao (CTCSM) is seeking books on science, technology, engineering, mathematics, humanities, social science, health, and agriculture.

    CTCSM is an institution that serves 400 Lumad scholars. (READ: Lumad children appeal to Duterte to save their schools)

    School administrator Pia Perez told Rappler that if they get the nod of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), they will fulfill their institution's mission to become the first dedicated Lumad college in the Philippines.

    "Part of the CHED accreditation to secure a permit is the acquisition of at least 3,000 to 5,000 books on our second year of operation," added Perez. 

    The Lumad institution aims to open a technical-vocational education program with at least two majors: computer technology and civil technology.

    According to Perez, CTCSM hopes to help at least 50 students through the program.

    How to donate

    Interested donors in Metro Manila can drop off books at the following offices:

    • Manila: University of Santo Tomas NSTP office - look for teacher Adrian Romero
    • Quezon City: University of the Philippines Diliman Academic Union Office - look for teacher Sharin Briones

    Donors outside Metro Manila can message CTCSM via email at ctcsm24@gmail.com or through its Facebook page. 

    Here are the specifications of the books:

    • Books must be published within the last 5 years
    • Reference materials for the circular offerings of the courses
    • Journals and magazines focused on the profession of the circular offerings
    • General references such as dictionaries, thesaurus, and encyclopedias, published within the last 5 years
    • Textbooks on civil technology, civil engineering, computer technology, and education

    CTCSM targets to complete the 3,000-book requirement by September 20.

    "Hopefully, with the success of the ongoing book drive, we shall receive CHED's nod for a permit to operate for the school year 2019-2020," Perez said. (READ: Why Lumad groups are camping outside DepEd– Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – Nowadays, it's a lose-lose situation when getting around Metro Manila – and the Philippines in general. Motorists endure harrowing traffic jams, commuters wrestle their way through buses and jeeps, sidewalks are not pedestrian-friendly, and bikers have to contend with the hazards of the reckless four-wheel automobile.

    Why are we so bereft of options?

    Road safety advocate Vince Lazatin and Muntinlupa City Representative Ruffy Biazon, an occasional commuter, talk about this sorry state of affairs – and experience it firsthand on a bus ride from Fairview in Quezon City to Makati City. – Rappler.com


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    CEBU, Philippines – What is your pledge to fight disinformation?

    On August 30, 2018, students at the University of San Carlos (USC) in Cebu City answered this question at the #MoveCebu: Social good in the digital age forum and workshop.

    After a stimulating morning forum with speakers from Manila and Cebu, USC students worked on honing their skills at workshops held during the afternoon.

    Outside the workshop venue, Rappler set up a photo booth where students could answer one of two questions: "What is your pledge to fight disinformation?" and "What is your pledge to defend press freedom?"

    Students shared their learnings from the morning sessions as well as their own inspiring vows to help keep their social feeds free from misleading posts and harmful trolls.

    Here's what they pledged:

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    Critical thinking and responsible posting were the main themes of the answers, with one student pledging to speak for the truth, and another pledging to educate the misinformed. 

    Responsible use of social media

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    During the morning's forum, students listened to industry leaders as they talked about the dangers of staying silent amidst the current landscape of disinformation and trolls.

    In the afternoon workshops, students discovered several ways to practice the responsible use of social media. (READ: How to be a responsible netizen? Keep calm and think before you click

    One of the ways discussed was by learning how to report critical alerts during disaster situations using MovePH's Agos platform. By being aware of the proper hashtags and keywords, participants were able to practice the necessary skills for saving lives in emergencies.

    Checking your sources

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    In terms of article writing and reporting, workshop participants were able to flex their fingers during the storytelling session where they learned the importance of checking and even double-checking their sources before accepting information. (READ: How we do our fact check) 

    Aside from practicing effective storytelling for digital platforms, they learned that, as leaders in their communities, it is crucial to ensure the validity of the information they hold before share it with their peers.

    Staying engaged online

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    The third workshop session centered on fact-checking and using their social media presence to stop the spread of disinformation. Participants were able to test their knowledge of spotting disinformation and fake news online. (READ: In fighting disinformation and trolls, silence 'cannot be an option'

    Workshop participants got a closer look at how they can bring social good onto the digital landscape.

    Armed with the inspiring words from the morning session and the knowledge learned from the workshops, #MoveCebu attendees ended the day as vanguards of the information being shared online.

    Are you interested in partnering with Rappler and MovePH? Fill up the form here! –Rappler.com 

    Check the complete set of pledges made by USC students here. 


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    INCLUSIVE ART. Guests of the 'Primal' exhibit by Artsada Kagay-an Inc (AKI) view works of art by local artists. The exhibit aims to spread awareness about the realities faced by misrepresented and marginalized sectors in society. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    MANILA, Philippines – Local artists shed light on issues concerning marginalized sectors in Cagayan de Oro (CDO), the City of Golden Friendship, through a weeklong exhibit during their city's recent Higalaay Festival. 

    Artsada Kagay-an Inc (AKI) exhibited paintings at Limketkai Center from August 25 to 31 to "increase awareness and stimulate appreciation of the vibrant culture of the indigenous people."

    AKI is a CDO-based art organization composed of artists born and raised, or are currently residing, in CDO. "Artsada" is a word derived from "art" and the city's colloquial term for beautiful, "tsada." The group's exhibit was called "Primal." 

    Issues tackled by the artworks include the displacement of the indigenous communities, the exploitation of natural resources in Mindanao, and the plight of women who raise families on their own.

    Views on canvas

    The exhibit displayed over 30 artworks, most of which were paintings completed by members of the organization and guest artists hailing from CDO.

    In an acrylic on canvas, CDO-based artist Emmie Borres painted a portrait of a Manobo woman, in traditional garment and headgear, gazing at a distance. Although it can be interpreted in many ways, the solemn but hopeful gaze, according to the artist, represents the strength that the indigenous communities in Mindanao have held on to amid displacement.

    MANOBO LADY. Emie Borres' painting shows an individual from the Manobo tribe, one of the many indigenous communities that originally settled in some areas of Cagayan de Oro City. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    This theme resonated with Ryan Arces' "Puloy-anan." The painting, which showed an abstract of jagged mountains splashed with iridescent colors, symbolized ancestral domain of indigenous communities that had been driven from their homeland by colonial powers since the 17th century. The colors also represented the IP's sovereignty over their territories.

    PULOY-ANAN. Ryan Marc Boiser Arces' painting represents the sovereignty of the indigenous people who have sought refuge in the mountains. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    By defending their lands, many lives from the indigenous communities had been taken.

    In his attempt to immortalize their legacies, Brad Arces painted a cracked sculpture that epitomized unnamed heroes in history who had fought and who are still fighting for liberation.

    UNNAMED HEROES. Brad Boiser Arces honors heroes who have not been recognized in history for their valor and bravery in the battles they fought through his painting. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    But heroism may not only be exemplified by the will to fight. AKI President Lloyd Hinosolango portrayed the significant role of Filipino women in nurturing life and earning for livelihood to raise their children in his painting, "Ilaw ng Tahanan."

    ILAW NG TAHANAN. AKI President Lloyd Hinosolango paints the roles of mothers in families. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    This trait was also represented in Ryan Arces' "Strong and Wise" where the face of a determined woman is bordered by a bull that represents her strength, an eagle that measures her wisdom, and a wheel that reveals her drive to accomplish great things by applying these qualities in her life.

    STRONG AND WISE. Strength and wisdom are among the values exemplified by women as revealed in Ryan Marc Arces' painting. Photo by Angelo Lorenzo

    But despite the different images the paintings presented, they all spoke of a single theme which empowers marginalized communities in present-day societies.

    Melting pot for artists

    "My dream is to see art thrive," Borres, who has been a visual artist all his life, stated in an interview. Borres was among the guest artists of the exhibit.

    Although initiatives to promote local art have grown over the years, the issues displayed in the crafts still continue today. Instead of just sharing works on canvas accomplished through creativity and talent, artists can use their gifts to advance cultural understanding and unity among the diverse groups in the city.

    As the cofounder of the Oro Arts Guild, Borres pushes for art that speaks with relevant messages. He also supports initiatives where artists can present their personal views on social issues.

    "Nowadays, we hold art exhibits [with this intent], as our artists are eager to pursue their passion," he said.

    Some works, such as that of Edgardo Palad, also a CDO-based artist and principal sponsor for the exhibit, were based on their experiences of traveling to places and meeting different kinds of people.

    Although CDO's identity changes according to the accomplishments of the city's people, AKI desires for the city to be the melting pot for inclusive art, where any artist or enthusiast of the craft can thrive by pursuing what they love to do and raise awareness on realities that surround them.

    "Whatever you have in mind, put it on canvas," Borres said.

    This does not only apply to CDO, but to many places in the Philippines where artists are nurtured, art is appreciated, and social issues need to be addressed.

    This year's exhibit included paintings by Mariegold Cherie Garido, Edgardo Palad, Hipolito Busgano, Lloyd Hinosolango, Mark Bailo, Jayson Labtan, Kahlil Dumagat, Ryan Marcx Boiser Arces, Leah Grace Deatras, Hansley Domughp, Mar John Sayson, Jensen Jimenez, Brad Boiser Arces, and Mary Jane Tolentino.

    It also featured artworks by Nic Aca, Ramil O. Paring and Dodie Borres. – Rappler.com

    Angelo Lorenzo is one of Rappler's Movers based in Cagayan de Oro City. A graduate of Development Journalism, he is currently pursuing his master's degree in literature at Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan.


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    ANONYMOUS PAGES. Experts remind Cebuanos to be vigilant when getting information from anonymous pages. Photos from Mars Mosqueda Jr and Lapu Lapu City Facebook page

    CEBU CITY, Philippines – In July 2017, a number of schools in Cebu City canceled classes following a social media post on an alleged bomb threat. Cebu Flash Report (CFR), a popular Facebook page, carried the unverified post on its news feed and amplified it to its almost 400,000 followers. 

    After authorities established that the threat was fake, CFR took down its post. Unfortunately, the post lingered long enough on social media to cause unnecessary panic among residents. (READ: Cebu journalists seek charges vs 'fake news' page admin

    This incident was shared by Sol Amante, editor of local newspaper SunStar Cebu, during the panel discussion at #MoveCebu: Social good in the digital age. The event was organized by MovePH, Rappler's civic engagement arm, at the University of San Carlos (USC) on Thursday, August 30.

    "Nobody had taken the pains to verify it, and when mainstream media called out to verify it, they said, inggit lang kayo sa traffic namin (you are just envious of our online traffic)," Amante said. 

    Unlike mainstream media and many other blogs, Cebu Flash Report is run by anonymous personalities, which means they have no public accountability.

    At Move Cebu, experts like Amante warned Cebuanos about popular but anonymous social media pages like Cebu Flash Report. Amante said Cebuanos should take posts from CFR and similar pages with a "handful" of salt.  

    Impact on social media 

    The bomb scare incident, after all, was not an isolated case. 

    "We in the mainstream have some issues regarding CFR because, for one thing, we have documented several instances of them using content that isn't theirs and passing off as original content," Amante added.

    The Cebuano news editor also shared how the photos posted by their reporters during the coverage of the Metro Gaisano mall fire in January were reposted on the same Facebook page without permission.

    While not all of CFR's posts are bad or false, Amante cautioned Cebuanos about posts from CFR and other similar pages. Echoing this call, Nestor Ramirez, member of the Cebuano Association for Communication Educators, pushed for media literacy to help combat the spread of disinformation online.

    "It's like we are not aware of the power of a very important tool that we always carry. We treat our gadgets like a toy. We don't understand the consequences if we misuse this one. What is needed is for us to be educated and to be reflective of these consequences of misusing this very important tool," Ramirez said.

    The problem with online false information which Cebu journalists and the local academe face is not unique.

    Global phenomenon

    During the forum, Rappler CEO Maria Ressa also discussed how the technology has been used to attack media credibility, spread online disinformation, and promote “patriotic trolling" in the Philippines and worldwide. 

    "Where I led and loved technology, I started to see its dangers... What am I saying is that we are part of the global trend that is being taken apart all around the world," Ressa said. 

    In the face of disinformation and trolling online, Amante, Ramirez, and Ressa agreed that there is reason to hope. Ressa, for example, recounted how social media have been used in the Philippines to save Filipinos during disasters, change the life of a street kid, and extend the life of an overseas Filipino worker who was put on death row. 

    "You are in the frontline on what social media can be. Are you going to use it for good? Are you going to use it for evil? Are you going to be part of the mob or the wisdom of the crowd?" Ressa asked. 

    Amante, on the other hand, reminded the public of their responsibility as a social media user.

    "You don't have to be a journalist to care about the quality of information that you share and post," she said. 

    Heeding these challenges, USC students pledged to fight disinformation online and be responsible social media users. (READ: USC students pledge to fight disinformation, defend press freedom) – Rappler.com 


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    CEBU, Philippines – MovePH, Rappler's civic engagement arm, visits the Queen City of the South!

    On #MoveSessions, Cebu-based indie-folk singer Vincent Eco performs 3 songs from his debut album at Handuraw Pizza in Cebu City.

    #MoveSessions is a regular online live jam that features up-and-coming performers and artists from the local music scene, communities, and schools.

    Eco was introduced to music by his father at a young age, but he wasn't always into indie-folk. During his high school years, he was a drummer in a rock band. He later gained fame as a solo acoustic artist in Cebu.

    Don't miss this #MoveSessions live on Thursday, September 6! – Rappler.com


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    UPHOLDING TRUTH. #MoveCDO participants vow to stop disinformation through fact checking.

    CAGAYAN DE ORO, Philippines – Students from all over Northern Mindanao vowed to fight disinformation and defend press freedom through fact-checking after the #MoveCDO forum and workshop on Thursday, September 6.

    The students answered two main questions in Rappler's photo booth for #MoveCDO: "What is your pledge to fight disinformation?" and "What is your pledge to defend press freedom?"

    Check out their pledges here:

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    In the morning forum, students listened as media practitioners and instructors discussed strong reactions to controversial stories. The panel discussion highlighted how truth is especially critical in Mindanao since many Duterte supporters come from this island group.

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    Meanwhile, the afternoon workshops offered various options for how social media, coupled with thorough fact-checking, can be avenues for social good.

    Among these options were Rappler's X platform, where content creators can publish their stories, and MovePH's Agos platform, a collaborative effort to plot reports in one map during disaster scenarios. (READ: How to be a responsible netizen? Keep calm and think before you click)

    Through fact-checking, workshop participants can verify reports and use the proper hashtags to have the skills needed to save lives during disasters.

    Those with a knack for narratives had their own storytelling session that focused on double-checking information and sources, as well as exercising effective storytelling techniques. (READ: How we do our fact check)

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    The third workshop tested participants' skills to spot fake news online. It centered on maximizing the potential of social media presence to stop the spread of disinformation. (READ: In fighting disinformation and trolls, silence 'cannot be an option')

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    Inspired by the rich potential of the digital landscape to achieve social good, #MoveCDO attendees now stand as watchdogs to provide another line of defense in the fight against disinformation.

    Are you interested in partnering with Rappler and MovePH? Fill up the form here–Rappler.com

    Rappler sustains its fact-check efforts with support from Facebook's Third Party Fact Checker Program, our crowdfunding donors, Friedrich Naumann Foundation (FNF) and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).


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    MANILA, Philippines – Disruptive technologies have demonstrated the capacity to build vital connections, improve lives, and solve some of the world's most pressing problems. 

    They promise better health care, more accessible and relevant education, smarter energy consumption, more efficiently-run cities and communities, and even ways to solve one of the biggest threats to mankind: climate change.

    Yet, all over the world in the past couple of years, global giants at the forefront of these technologies also tested our trust. 

    The Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal in April 2018 revealed the threats these technologies pose to individual privacy and society at large. The rise of bots, fake accounts, and trolls have transformed a platform once described as a catalyst for causes into a powerful weapon for spreading hate and undermining democratic institutions. 

    In this age of creative destruction, is it possible for social responsibility and disruptive innovation to co-exist? Is it possible to design scalable solutions and achieve impact without "breaking things," as the Silicon Valley ethos dictates? 

    If you have answers to these questions, then you are what we are looking for. 

    This 2018, Rappler, in partnership with the Youth Co:Lab initiative of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), challenges you to create impactful innovations that take into consideration lessons from today's moral dilemmas.

    On its 3rd year, #HackSociety wants you to help build tomorrow through "hacks" that would make our society more inclusive and humane: technology-enhanced, enterprise-driven solutions that bring us closer to the #2030Now goal to leave no one behind. 

    Bottom line, we want to build tomorrow anchored on the fusion of technology and socially accountable enterpise. 

    Socially relevant, tech-aided innovation

    HACKSOCIETY. In 2017, HackSociety finalists underwent a 30-hour challenge where they refined their idea with mentors and experts.

    The goal of #HackSociety since we launched it in 2016 is to crowdsource "hacks" that address key social issues while harnessing the new democratic space of technology. Within this ideathon, we teach the innovation process and inspire students and young professionals to think outside the box and form ideas on viable ventures. It's a first step towards building social enterprise-driven solutions to social problems.

    Selected teams learn new concepts, talk with experts and mentor and refine their ideas, and jumpstart their innovations by building prototypes.

    Through these workshops, we hope to encourage responsible and technology-driven enterprise and innovation among the youth, one that is grounded on a clear understanding of social realities.

    Here are this year's 5 key areas and problem statements:

    Media and democracy

    • How can we fight the spread of disinformation and hate in digital platforms?
    • How can we help the youth tap into the power of digital technologies while alerting and educating them about its risks and dangers?

    Peace

    • What type of livelihood can reintegrate combatants and how can this be done?
    • How can we help disengage those on pathways to extremism or radicalization?

    Governance and local development

    • How can communities manage change, digitize, and deliver effective services?

    Environment and climate change

    • How can communities effectively beat plastic pollution?

    Public health and well-being

    • How can communities bring down maternal mortality?
    • How can communities help make roads safer?

     

    Ready to take on the challenge? Here are simple steps on how you could join:

    1. Create a team with two to 5 members. All team members must be under 30 years old.

    2. The hack must show relevance/focus on at least two SDGs

    3. All ideas are welcome. However, solutions with differentiators like digital and information technology innovations or multi-disciplinary team compositions will rank higher. It could be an application of existing innovations or systems to current challenges, or new approaches or tweaks to existing programs.

    4. Submit your idea through this form and answer the following questions:

    • How will your "hack" leave no one behind?
    • What is the specific problem you are solving?
    • Describe the solution you are proposing. How will the solution solve the problem you want to address?
    • What makes your solution innovative and sustainable? How will you incorporate technology to aid your proposed solution?
    • Identify your key stakeholders, target partners, and needed resources.
    • Introduce your teammates and their respective roles in implementing your idea.

    The deadline for submission of entries is on September 26. Chosen entries will be notified on or before October 1, and will be invited to participate in the 30-Hour Challenge workshops for each of the key areas.

    What’s at stake?

    After a series of workshops, mentoring, and elimination, the best and most viable proposal for each category would have a chance to deliver their pitch at the #HackSociety, Rappler HQ, Estancia Mall Offices, Pasig City on October 10 and 11.

    • Winners will represent the Philippines in the UNDP-Youth Co:Lab Asia-Pacific Regional and Global Summits happening early 2019. All expenses will be covered. 
    • Access to Rappler events, workshops, and trainings. These events will provide winners with opportunities to network with partners who can provide mentorship and help refine your product/service and business model.

    • Production of one social video for their winning idea/innovation. The social video will be posted via Rappler and Move.PH social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

    Don’t miss out on this opportunity. This is your chance to create the change you want to see in our society. Talk with your peers, form a group, think of your solution, and submit your entry.

    If you have any questions, email us at socialgood@rappler.com using #HackSociety in the subject line.

    #HackSociety background

    During the 2016 Social Good Summit, we introduced the first round of #HackSociety as an experiment where decision makers met ordinary people, and where both worked together to solve common problems and challenges. One startup that emerged from this experiment is Uproot Aquaphonics, a social enterprise that promotes water-based farming to help Filipinos grow their own food.

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thanks, Rappler <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HackSociety?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HackSociety</a> and UNDP <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YouthColab?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#YouthColab</a> team for supporting <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AroogaHealth?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AroogaHealth</a>! &lt;3 <a href="https://t.co/RWfX77j6VF">pic.twitter.com/RWfX77j6VF</a></p>&mdash; Dom De Leon (@domdeleon) <a href="https://twitter.com/domdeleon/status/941644243583451136?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 15, 2017</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

    In 2017, we spun off #HackSociety as a separate event with hack workshops focusing on 4 key areas.  After providing them with data to help ground and refine their pitches, shortlisted participants worked on accelerating their ideas to a prototype through a 30-hour challenge.

    The 3 winning start-ups LawKo, Phinix, and Arooga Health have gone a long way since winning in #HackSociety 2017. (READ: PH startups win international youth competition)

    In December 2017, AroogaHealth won MaGIC Malaysia's Pre-Accelerator Bootcamp. In March, Phinix also won the UN Environment Asia-Pacific's Low Carbon Business Challenge. 

    All 3 also emerged as top prize winners at the Youth Co:Lab Regional Social Innovation Challenge 2018 held in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 28.

    Two Philippine start-up teams won international awards in Beijing, China, for projects that help achieve the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs). Start-up teams Arooga Health and Phinix also bagged two of the 5 2018 Asia-Pacific Youth SDG Innovative Awards in Beijing on August 2. – Rappler.com

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – To bridge the online gap, Rappler’s MovePH will hold #MoveLeyte: “Social Good in the Digital Age” forum at the RDE Hall in the Visayas State University on September 19.

    The rise of digital technology has allowed all of us to publish our own content and choose what content matters to us.

    While this gave ordinary citizens a voice in the global conversation, the gatekeeping powers of traditional media is being compromised, significantly changing the journalism process. It has also resulted in the rise of fake accounts, hate groups, and disinformation.

    Read Rappler's propaganda war series:

    How do we use social media for social good? This is the primary question the forum intends to answer.

    At least 500 campus journalists, student organization leaders, school paper advisers, and other stakeholders will join the forum which will help them understand the nature of digital platforms and spark a conversation around opportunities and threats to journalism and democracy in these trying times.

    Tickets to the forum are free, but seats are limited. Register below to secure your tickets now.

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    Here is the program:

    Time Activity
    7:30 - 8:35 am

    Registration

    8:35 - 8:45 am

     

    Welcome remarks

    Dr. Edgardo E. Tulin
    President, VSU

    9:15 - 9:30 am

     

    Discussion: Getting to know you/Levelling-off activity

    9:30 - 10:15 am

     

    Power of social media: Using technology for social good 
    Gemma Bagayaua-Mendoza
    Head of Research and Strategy, Rappler

     

    10:15 - 10:45 am

    Discussion: Digital media etiquette

     

    10:45 - 11:15 am

     

    Responsible use of digital media

    Stacy de Jesus
    Head, MovePH and Digital Communications, Rappler

    11:15 - 11:45 am

     

    Panel discussion: Why facts matter

    Miriam Grace Go
    News Editor, Rappler

    Jed Asaph Cortes
    Head, Visayas State University web team

    Hanna Joyce Macawili
    Managing Editor, The Amaranth

    Stacy de Jesus
    Head, MovePH and Digital Communications, Rappler

    Moderated by:

    Raisa Serafica
    Unit Head of Civic Engagement, Rappler

     

    11:45 - 12:00 pm

     

     

    Synthesis

    The forum will be followed by a workshop on online fact-checking and verification.

    Time Activity
    1:00 - 1:30 pm

    Welcome remarks 

    1:30 - 2:00 pm

     

    Group Dynamics: Icebreaker/Getting-to-know-you activity

    2:00 - 2:45 pm

     

    Session I: Fact check 101

    2:45 - 3:15 pm

     

    Session II: Harnessing social media for civic engagement
     

    3:15 - 4:00 pm

    Fact-checking exercises

    - Agos: Fact check in a humanitarian/disaster scenario 
    Spot Check: An exercise in fact-checking online content
    - Using X: Internal factchecking in storytelling 

    4:00 - 4:15 pm

     

    Call to action: Be a Mover 

    Stacy de Jesus
    Head, MovePH and Digital Communications, Rappler

    #MoveLeyte is organized by Rappler in partnership with the Visayas State University. – Rappler.com

    Rappler sustains its fact-check efforts with support from Facebook's Third Party Fact Checker Program, our crowdfunding donors, Friedrich Naumann Foundation (FNF), and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).


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    MANILA, Philippines – After some confusion on whether it would push through or not, the highly anticipated "address" of President Rodrigo Duterte to the people was aired live on state-run PTV4 on Tuesday afternoon, September 11.

    After the one hour-and-a-half "téte-a-téte" between Duterte and Chief Legal Counsel Salvador Panelo, netizens expressed their frustration over the President's confusing statements, as well as his habit of jumping from one topic to another.  

    Twitter user @jaydnvr thought that Malacañang should have let the media ask questions instead of Panelo. Some called out the Palace lawyer's showbiz-style questions.

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="tl" dir="ltr">I think <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Duterte?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Duterte</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Panelo?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Panelo</a> made the tete-a-tete yesterday kasi they fear that the media will bombard them hot seat questions haynako. Isa rin to si <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Trillanes?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Trillanes</a> eh??? May pa presscon pang nalalaman. Sana inuna nila ung issue kagaya ng bakit wala ng siling labuyo ang bicol express</p>&mdash; septembaby (@jaydnvr) <a href="https://twitter.com/jaydnvr/status/1039698145469333505?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 12, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Panelo in his most daring role as Tito Boy. <a href="https://t.co/VXlmJjHSNf">pic.twitter.com/VXlmJjHSNf</a></p>&mdash;  (@puuuse) <a href="https://twitter.com/puuuse/status/1039441928603877376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 11, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="tl" dir="ltr">Si Panelo pala ang Tito Boy ng Malacañang. Inaabangan ko ang Fast Talk portion at ang pagsabi nya ng “Susunod”.</p>&mdash; Joanna D.  (@IAmJoannaD) <a href="https://twitter.com/IAmJoannaD/status/1039426797849341952?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 11, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    Other netizens said that the interview apparently revolved around Trillanes, turning much of the conversation into a rant session.  (LIST: False claims of Duterte, Panelo about legal issues on Trillanes amnesty)

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fposts%2F2244982805522490%3Fcomment_id%3D2244986808855423&include_parent=false" width="560" height="141" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="ht" dir="ltr">The tête-à-tête talkshow of Mr. Duterte and Salvador Panelo does not necessarily talk about combating inflation and poverty.Rather it talks more about Trillanes, his amnesty, et al.<br><br>Ginoong Pangulo, ang kalaban mo ay inflation at kahirapan -- hindi ang Oposisyon. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/OneOpposition?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#OneOpposition</a></p>&mdash; Rayyan Jabril || جِبْرِيل‎ ريَّان (@luceat_lux88) <a href="https://twitter.com/luceat_lux88/status/1039700388226641920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 12, 2018</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    Check out what other netizens had to say:

    {source}<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/comment_embed.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frapplerdotcom%2Fposts%2F2244982805522490%3Fcomment_id%3D2245410142146423&include_parent=false" width="560" height="161" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>{/source}

    {source}<a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/rapplerdotcom/timelines/1039693727235694593?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">Têtê-a-têtê - Curated tweets by rapplerdotcom</a> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>{/source}

    What are your thoughts about the interview? Were your concerns addressed or do you feel the President skirted more important issues? Share your opinion on X!– Rappler.com 

    Stories related to Duterte's interview with Panelo:


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  • 09/12/18--00:59: Volunteer for Agos today
  • MANILA, Philippines – MovePH, the civic engagement arm of Rappler, is looking for volunteers who can assist in gathering critical information from social media on Typhoon Mangkhut (local name Ompong).

    The digital humanitarians will use the platform Agos, powered by eBayanihan. Agos is a one-stop online platform that helps gather information to achieve #ZeroCasualty when disasters strike.

    We need volunteers to gather the following information:

    • Reports of floods

    • Reports of landslides and other hazards

    • People in need of rescue

    • Infrastructure damage (e.g., roads, bridges, cell sites)

    The information that digital humanitarians gather and verify will be relayed to national government agencies and local responders. 

    Citizen journalists can also send reports, photos, and videos on how their families and communities are preparing for the coming tropical cyclone. 

    Be an online volunteer today!

    Click the button below to register as a volunteer or fill up thisform.

     Be a digital humanitarian today! – Rappler.com

    If you have any questions, feedback, or additional information, please email move.ph@rappler.com or tweet @moveph.

    Get the latest #WeatherAlert and typhoon updates on Agos 


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