Quantcast
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | .... | 51 | 52 | (Page 53) | 54 | 55 | .... | 108 | newer

    0 0

    Bookmark this page for updates

    MANILA, Philippines – Listen to people with passion projects and how they faced challenges as they carry them out.

    On Saturday, September 16, Rappler and the United Nations in the Philippines, through the United Nations Development Programme, will hold the main event of the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit.

    The 2017 Manila Social Good Summit will explore the purpose of innovation and push back to the center stage the massive and urgent needs that the society faces. 

    At 10 am, groups and individuals will share their stories on programs and initiatives they are passionate about at the #InspireCourage +SocialGood stories segment. (READ: Meet the speakers and guests at the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit)

    Here's the program for the #InspireCourage +SocialGood segment:

    #InspireCourage +SocialGood 

    10 to 11:30 am

    PROGRAM HOSTS
    Natashya Gutierrez
    Rappler Regional Correspondent for Southeast Asia
    Atom Araullo
    UNHCR Advocate

     

    10:00 AM to 10:05 AM

    Welcome Remarks

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, Move.PH

    10:05 AM to 10:20 AM

    Keynote speech:

    Youth and Entrepreneurship

    Sec. Joey Concepcion

    Presidential Adviser for Entrepreneurship

    10:21 AM to 10:28 AM

    Women’s health

    Zarina San Jose

    World Youth Alliance Asia Pacific

    10:28 AM to 10:35 AM

    HIV Awareness

    Paul Junio

    LoveYourself

    10:37 AM to 10:44 AM

    How do we achieve safer roads in the Philippines?

    PSUPT (Atty) Oliver Sy Tanseco

    Highway Patrol Group

    10:44 AM to 10:49 AM

    Why we ride

    Myles Delfin

    Bike Scouts

    10:49 AM to 10:56 AM

    Why farming is important

    Ryan Bestre

    #IAmHampasLupaEcological Agriculture Movement

    10:56 AM to 11:03 AM

    Education and bottled water

    Micaela Agoncillo

    Generation Hope

    11:03 to 11:18 AM

    Advocacy to solve hunger and malnutrition

    Eunice Braga

    Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

    11:18 AM to 11:25 AM

    Giving hope to the hopeless

    Fr Flavie Villanueva

    Andrew Janssen Kalinga Center

    – Rappler.com

    Tell us what you think about the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit by tweeting with the hashtag #2030NOW!


    0 0

    Bookmark this page for updates

    MANILA, Philippines – On Saturday, September 16, Rappler and the United Nations in the Philippines through the United Nations Development Programme, will hold the main event of the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit.

    With the theme "Innovate with Purpose: Leave No One Behind," the 2017 Social Good Summit in the Philippines will challenge us to examine the purpose of innovation: Where are we? Where do we want to go? How do we get there?

    This is the main event where there will be discussions on big ideas shaping the world today. (READ: Meet the speakers and guests at the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit)

    The grand winner of the #HackSociety, an ideathon that aims to crowdsource solutions to society's problems, will also be announced on Saturday after two days of breakout sessions and mentoring.

    Here's the program for the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit main plenary:

    #2030NOW
    Innovate with purpose, Leave No One Behind

    PROGRAM HOSTS
    Natashya Gutierrez
    Rappler Regional Correspondent for Southeast Asia
    Atom Araullo
    UNHCR Advocate

    12:30 PM to 1:00 PM

    Pre-rolls

     

    1:00 PM to 1:10 PM

    (10 minutes)

    Opening Performance

    Alienette Coldfire

    Youtube sensation and Global citizen

    1:10 PM to 1:30 PM

    (20 minutes)

    Welcome Remarks

    Maria Ressa

    CEO and Executive Editor, Rappler

    1:30 PM to 1:50 PM

    (20 minutes)

    Designing innovation: a story of success built from failure

    Ariel Lacsamana

    President and Managing Director, 3M Philippines

    1:50 PM to 2:20 PM

    (30 minutes)

    Panel :

    Challenges to innovation and entrepreneurship in the Philippines:

    What is preventing the local start-up scene from taking off?

    Usec Mon Ibrahim

    Department of Information and Communications Technology


    Usec Rosemarie Edillon

    Planning and Policy, National Economic and Development Authority


    JJ Disini

    Managing Partner, Disini & Disini Law Offices


    Diane Eustaquio

    Executive Direcotr, IdeaSpace

    Moderator

    Lala Rimando

    Rappler Business Desk Editor

    2:20 PM to 2:40 PM

    (20 minutes)

    Why youth entrepreneurship is important to achieving the SDGs by 2030

    Ola Almgren

    United Nations Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative in the Philippines

    2:40 PM to 3:10 PM

    (30 minutes)

    Pitches: 4 #HackSociety finalists

    (5 minutes each)

    Board of Judges:


    Ola Almgren

    UN Resident Coordinator


    Maria Ressa

    CEO and Executive Editor, Rappler


    Hon. Antolin Oreta

    Mayor, Malabon


    Aneth Lim

    Public Affairs and Corporate Citizenship in Philippines, Citi Foundation


    Monday Gonzalez

    Director, Sustainability, Globe Telecom

    3:10 PM to 3:30 PM

    (20 minutes)

    Pathways to Progress: Youth Economic Prospects and Expectations

    Aneth Lim

    Public Affairs and Corporate Citizenship in Philippines, Citi Foundation

    3:30 PM to 3:50 PM

    (20 minutes)

    Technology and personal privacy

    Mon Liboro

    Chairperson, National Privacy Commission

    3:50 PM to 4:20 PM

    (30 minutes)

    Panel discussion:

    Technology, democracy and citizen engagement:

    How citizens, particularly marginalized groups can use technology to hold leaders, at national and local levels, accountable for key developmental outcomes?

    Kris Ablan

    Assistant Secretary, PCOO and Lead, FOI Project Management group


    Mon Liboro

    Chairperson,  National Privacy Commission


    Jane Uymatiao

    Blogger, Blogwatch


    Vince Lazatin

    Executive Director, Transparency and Accountability Network


    Moderator:

    Chay Hofileña

    Head, Rappler Investigative Desk

    04:20 PM to 4:50 PM

    (30 minutes)

    Panel discussion:

    Using social media to promote social good

    John Arcilla

    Actor and environmentalist


    Laura Lehmann

    Miss World Philippines 2017


    Miguel Bermundo

    Program Manager for Education, Citizenship, Globe Telecom



    Moderator:

    Natashya Gutierrez

    Rappler Regional Correspondent for Southeast Asia

    4:50 PM to 5:00 PM

    Announcement:

    #HackSociety overall winner

     

    5:00 PM to 5:15 PM

    Closing and Thanks

    Gemma Mendoza

    Social Good Summit Project Lead

    – Rappler.com

    Tell us what you think about the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit by tweeting with the hashtag #2030NOW!


    0 0

    DAY 2. The second day of HackSociety saw finalists pitching their ideas for the semi-final round. All photos by LeAnne Jazul/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Finalists in this year's #HackSociety pitched their innovative solutions and creative ideas during the semi-final round held on Friday, September 15.

    Rappler, in partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is holding #HackSociety, a two-day hackathon on September 14 and 15, that aims to crowdsource "hacks" or innovative solutions. (READ: #HackSociety 2017: Innovate with purpose, leave no one behind)

    The finalists, selected from over a hundred crowdsourced hacks, presented ideas for projects and apps that aim to use technology to solve social problems and help ensure that in the Philippines, no one will be left behind.

    Day 1 saw the finalists refining their ideas through workshops and tips from expert mentors. (READ: HIGHLIGHTS: #HackSociety Day 1)

    Here are the highlights from Day 2 of #HackSociety.

    Pitching sessions

    The finalists were each given 5 minutes to present their ideas and how these can help solve problems in 4 key areas: media and democracy; peace, governance and local development; environment and climate change; and public health and wellbeing.

    The media and democracy group presented ideas to help marginalized sectors of society, such as persons with disabilities (PWDs), and helping ordinary people understand complex legal processes. (READ: #HackSociety 2017: Using tech to help the marginalized)

    The peace and governance group, meanwhile, wants to help connect Filipinos to their government and improve collaboration between the two. (READ: #HackSociety 2017: 5 ideas for better governance in the PH)

    For the group on environment and climate change, their ideas focused on promoting agriculture and managing waste to promote a zero-waste lifestyle among Filipinos.

    Addressing mental health and hunger were just some of the ideas presented by the group on public health. They aim to use technology to make an impact on Filipinos' wellbeing.

    Standout ideas

    At the end of the pitching session, one winner from each of the 4 themes was selected.

    The winning ideas were:

    • LawKo for media and democracy
    • Tuto Club for peace, governance, and local development
    • Phinix Textile Recycling for environment and climate change
    • Arooga Health for public health and wellbeing

    The finalists are set to pitch their ideas during Social Good Summit 2017 on Saturday, September 16. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    INNOVATE. Ariel Lacsamana, managing director of 3M Philippines, shares how simple innovations can improve the lives of Filipinos. Photo from Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – From starting as a failure to becoming a $30-billion company, Ariel Lacsamana shared the story of how multinational firm 3M took the risks that led them to where they are today. 

    "Failure is never the end of the story. I started with 10 businesses. Three were successful 7 were failures," said Ariel Lacsamana, president and managing director of 3M Philippines, during the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit held on Saturday, September 16.

    Lacsama discussed how 3M was a failed mining venture. Their initial goal was to mine a hard mineral that can generate a lot of money. Unfortunately, the mineral they found turned out to be limited. 

    Expecting groundbreaking innovations from their venture, their first invention was not what they expected.

    The first invention of the $30-billion company today? Sandpaper.

    The product ended up a failure because of its inferior quality

    Instead of giving up from what seemed like a failure, Lacsamana shared how 3M didn't stop innovating and reinventing.

    "A sandpaper is made out of a mineral, paper, and glue. If you take out the mineral, you are left with paper and glue. That's tape. Remove the paper, that's glue," Lacsamana explained.

    These 3 inventions are now their company's largest business – adhesive, abrasive and film.

    15% culture

    The director emphasized the importance of investing time to create and innovate. 

    He advised the audience to apply the 15% rule, which stands for using 15% of one's time to do anything you want. Lacsama said that this rule has resulted to some of their most innovative inventions, such as the car tint and reinventions of the sandpaper. 

    He adds how a simple spark of creativity can ignite another idea.  "When we talk about innovation, it does not have to be complicated," he said.

    He also urged the audience to never stop taking risks and going out there to look for issues that can be solved because no matter how simple those ideas are, these can make a lasting and long-term impact. 

    From a simple invention such as the sandpaper 115 years ago, 3M proves how simple inventions can spark a chain of life-changing inventions that are seen until today. Smartphone screen, car insulation, office supplies, cleaning tools – these are just some of the simple solutions 3M invented that continue to improve the everyday lives of Filipinos. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    HEARTFELT DONATION. Canadian tourist John Abou-Samra will be donating P1.2 million worth of hospital equipment to the Coron District Hospital. Photo courtesy of John Abou-Samra

    MANILA, Philippines – John Abou-Samra, a Lebanese-born Canadian, has been saving up for a grand cruise around the world in time for his retirement in late 2017. But his plans changed after his visit in June to Coron, Palawan.

    Palawan has been recognized by global award-giving bodies for its wreck diving spots, pristine waters, and rich marine ecosystem. 

    Samra wanted to find these out for himself.

    Samra, who just came from a trip to El Nido, Palawan, was having the time of his life in Kayangan Lake, Coron, when his trip took an ugly turn.

    Accident in Palawan

    "I was walking. Everybody was walking. Suddenly, I tried to turn left to sit down, then two of these pieces of wood, they split out and my right leg sank between them until my hip," Samra recalled in a Skype interview with Rappler.

    Due to the accident, Samra cut-short his visit that day. He visited the Coron District Hospital the following day after the pain on his legs did not go away.

    "I went to the hospital, I meet Dr Edgar Flores, he examined me, and then two nurses came to me and they tried to make my legs relax, they cleaned it and everything," he said.

    During the check-up, he noted how, despite being small and "poor," the hospital is clean and well-kept. He said that despite the lack of equipment, the service the hospital employees showed him was world-class.

    "I was really impressed with the service and the care from all them – from the doctor to the nurses, the person who pushed the wheelchair to X-ray technician. All of them they were extremely nice to me," Samra said.

    On top of the excellent service, Samra said the doctors did not charge him anything.

    This is after the doctors confirmed that the X-ray results showed no fractures.

    "[Dr Flores] tapped my shoulder, and he said to me, 'You are fine, sir. Just take care of yourself,'" he said.

    Change of plans

    The excellent service he received from the Coron District hospital prompted him to change his plans about taking a cruise around the world.

    Instead of doing so, he decided to donate his P1.2 million ($23,300) worth of savings to buy equipment for the hospital.

    The following day, he returned to the hospital to deliver the good news to Dr Flores.

    {source}

    <iframe src="https://web.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fweb.facebook.com%2Ffreddie.bagunu%2Fposts%2F10203521964805613&width=500" width="500" height="389" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true"></iframe>

    {/source}

    "He looked at me and I could see tears in his eyes. He told me, 'Are you sure, Sir?' I said, 'Yes, I have never been sure and confident in my life more than this moment,'" he said.

    On Monday, September 18, Samra will be turning over an ECG, automatic voltage regulator, centrifuge, defibrillator, and stethoscope to the hospital.

    "I trust Dr Flores that he will take care of the equipment and hopefully many thousands, even tens of thousands of people, can benefit from the equipment," he said. Rappler.com

    $1 = P51.33


    0 0

    ONGOING DISCUSSION. Government regulators and innovators should discuss the impact of new technology. All photos by LeAnne Jazul/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – With technology moving at such a fast pace, innovations are cropping up, promising to be game changers in different fields. 

    But while startups are dreaming big with their plans to shake up various industries, there has to be an ongoing conversation with government regulators who may not readily accept these new ideas and technologies.

    This was underscored in a panel discussion at the 2017 Social Good Summit held on Saturday, September 16.

    The discussion focused on the challenges to innovation in the Philippines, and what various groups have been doing to promote entrepreneurship in the country.

    Ongoing conversation

    The recent deadlock between the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) and ride-hailing companies Grab and Uber reflects the challenges encountered by innovators clashing with government regulators.

    Uber is no stranger to controversy, encountering backlash in the places where it launched because its business model did not fit current transportation laws.

    The Philippines is unique in that respect, since it created new transport categories back in May 2015 to accommodate Grab and Uber's business models.

    In July this year, the LTFRB cracked down on unregistered drivers using the ride-hailing platforms, eventually leading to Uber's suspension and the imposition of a hefty fine. (READ: What's the fuss about the Grab, Uber regulation issue?

    The issue sparked controversy, with some criticizing the LTFRB while others pointed out the need for accountability and regulation for these transport network companies.

    Lawyer JJ Disini cited this issue as he discussed the challenge of balancing innovation with the need for government regulators to do their job and protect the public interest.

    In other countries, some firms can try out new ideas by participating in a regulatory sandbox, where businesses are allowed to test out their innovative products or business models without following some legal requirements.

    The results and information generated from participating in a regulatory sandbox can be used by the government to craft regulations that better fit the public need, Disini said.

    This way, both innovators and regulators can work together to learn and refine the new business models.

    "We need regulators to be there. Their job is to protect the general public, but we should also understand that they're constrained by that. At the same time, they want innovation as well. We do understand the complexities of the issues," Disini said.

    Supporting PH startups

    On the part of the government, there have been efforts among different government agencies to enable an environment where local startups can thrive.

    Rosemarie Edillon, planning and policy undersecretary of the National Economic and Development Authority, said entrepreneurship is key to helping the Philippine economy prosper.

    "One of the big problems we're trying to address is the economy, and the way to have more employment is to have more employers. So we see entrepreneurship as one strategy," Edillon said.

    "We actually need to grow much faster, and we need growth to be more inclusive. Key to that is entrepreneurship and innovation," she added.

    To help entrepreneurs and startups thrive, agencies like the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), the Department of Science and Technology, and the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) have their own programs geared toward budding entrepreneurs.

    The BSP, for instance, has a credit surety fund program to help micro, small, and medium enterprises obtain loans from banks.

    The DICT, meanwhile, has launched a roadmap for digital startups, that aims to provide a framework for developing the Philippine startup ecosystem.

    "It's so exciting today, we're glad that [Philippine startups] have become sexy," said Mon Ibrahim, undersecretary of the Department of Information and Communications Technology.

    For Diane Eustaquio, executive director of non-profit incubator IdeaSpace, encouraging millennials to take risks and overcome a fear of failure is crucial for boosting the local startup scene.

    "We're conditioned to follow and not to challenge, so it's difficult for people to become entrepreneurs," she said. 

    "I think that's the challenge, it's not in our culture to be allowed to fail... But it's that failure that allows you to try to be better than what you were before," she added. –Rappler.com


    0 0

    JOHN ARCILLA. The actor speaks about using social media responsibly. Rappler screen shot

    MANILA, Philippines – Millennials know John Arcilla for playing the angry, foul-mouthed Heneral Luna, who died for the love of his country. But the man who took the stage at the Social Good Summit was markedly different from his most famous role.

    Speaking calmly but passionately, Arcilla talked about how innovation and technology can and should be used to bring people together and create good.

    "We are surrounded by people whether we choose it or not. You are not alone, and they are not too," he said, stressing that every action has an effect on other people.

    He also talked about kindness in a world of harsh online trolls and bashers.

    "Caring is such a natural thing. Being uncaring is perverse. It is like you are trying not to eat for life,” he said. "Being nice is not a big deal, too. We don't even need to underline kindness, it is actually our purpose. Unkindness is unnatural."

    Arcilla underlined the importance of being responsible with posts and words.

    "We are all interconnected. No escape. Which means we cannot just do anything, say anything, post anything without thinking of its effect (on) someone in your circle or to a group of people who will read it. Choosing words to say is not hypocrisy, I think it is prudence, it is polite, I think it is human."

    'Let us innovate with purpose'

    For Arcilla, while kindness and caring are important, it doesn't mean not taking a stand, remaining neutral, or being apathetic.

    "Making no choice is actually a choice. We are actually empowering the other side of what is bothering us. So wherever you want to bring this country, wherever you want to bring your life, it will be up to you, it will be up to us," he said.

    However, taking a stand does not mean being partisan.

    "I don't believe in colors. Politically and racially speaking, let us not go there. Let's think of everybody's welfare," he said.

    The actor then turned his attention to innovation and technology. He questioned the purpose of innovations that divide and disconnect people, technology that enables irresponsibility.

    "How about technology that makes us closer as human beings instead of promoting hate cultures, or worse, making us divided as a nation, divided as citizens of this planet?" he said.

    "Let us innovate with purpose. When we post something, think of the welfare of others, think of the positive energy it can create. Think of the people who will be inspired, think of the society that you want to have, a planet that we want to be safe to live in," he added.

    He talked about the need for people to be responsible, to evaluate whenever they innovate or upgrade.

    "Next time we think of innovation or technology, think again: What kind of person do I want to be? Where do I want to bring this country? What do I want this planet to be made of?" he said. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    SGS 2017. This year's Social Good Summit bears the theme 'Innovate with Purpose: Leave No One Behind.' All photos by LeAnne Jazul/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – What can we do to help build a country where no one is left behind? What role can technology and social media play to create an inclusive society? 

    These were just some of the questions and challenges posed to participants of this year's Social Good Summit held on Saturday, September 16, 

    Since 2012, Rappler has been organizing the Philippine leg of the Social Good Summit, an annual global event organized around the United Nations General Assembly. It is sustained globally by +SocialGood, a community which shares world-changing ideas to spark action in our social media era.  

    With the theme: “Innovate with Purpose: Leave No One Behind,” the 2017 Social Good Summit in the Philippines challenges Filipinos to examine the purpose of innovation and how technology can be used to help create a society that leaves no one behind.

    Here are the highlights from this year's event.

    What's your social good story? 

    The morning part of the whole-day program features speakers sharing their passion projects and initiatives that can help the country achieve the global goals by 2030.

    For Joey Concepcion, presidential adviser on entrepreneurship, the growing digital economy presents a host of opportunities for millennials willing to take risks and take on the challenges. (READ: Duterte's adviser on entrepreneurship: Future lies in digital economy

    "The future for you is the digital economy that is growing...Tech space, whether it's robotics, AI (artificial intelligence), that is your advantage. Because you understand it more than we who are above 50, [the] 70, 80 generation. You are not scared of playing around with gadgets," said Concepcion.

    Technology and apps can play a significant role when it comes to health.

    Zarina San Jose of World Youth Alliance Philippines promoted the app FEPP (Fertility Education and Medical Management), which helps women monitor their reproductive health through biomarkers related to their menstrual cycle. 

    But changing people's mindset and fighting hate and stigma are equally important in the fight for a more inclusive society. To fight the growing HIV epidemic in the country, it's important to fight the stigma that comes with it through love and acceptance instead of hate. (READ: #2030NOW: Best cure for HIV/AIDS stigma? Love and acceptance

    Rappler CEO Maria Ressa also discussed Rappler's beginnings back in 2012, where the social news network married technology with journalism. She also introduced Rappler's #InspireCourage campaign and crowdfunding effort to support free and fearless journalism.

    Panel discussions and talks

    What are some of the challenges to innovation and entrepreneurship in the Philippines? During a panel discussion, experts highlighted the need for an ongoing discussion between government regulators looking out for the public interest and innovators who want to make their game-changing ideas a reality.

    Finding the formula for success isn't always as straightforward as it seems, and failure is an inevitable part of the experience, as illustrated in the experience of 3M. 

    Ariel Lacsamana, president and managing director of 3M Philippines, shared the story of how the multinational firm got to become a $30-billion company.

    How do you use social media for social good? Actor and environmentalist John Arcilla, Miss World Philippines 2017 Laura Lehmann, and Globe Telecom program manager Miguel Bermundo tackle this topic in a panel discussion where they talk about using technology to spread positivity instead of hate.

    For Arcilla, innovation and technology can and should be used to bring people together and create good.

    #HackSociety winners

    The SGS culminated with the overall winner for this year's #HackSociety, the ideathon that aims to crowdsource hacks or solutions to some of society's most pressing problems.

    Four finalists were selected during the semi-final round on September 15. (READ: Standout solutions: The winning ideas from #HackSociety 2017)

    Taking home the top prize was LawKo, which aimed to bridge the knowledge gap between a complicated legal system and the Filipino public through a Facebook chatbot.

    Instead of complex terms and legalese, the chatbot will present topics on civil procedure, criminal procedure, and other pertinent law topics in a way that's more understandable to the average Filipino user. The chatbot can direct users to relevant offices and courts, answer questions on law procedures, and make this information much more accessible and comprehensible.

    "Legal processes shouldn't be this hard to understand. Through these dark times, LawKo aims to shed light for the ordinary citizen," said Alexandra Austria. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    PRIVACY. Mon Liboro from the National Privacy Commission talks about the importance of data privacy today. Photo from Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Technology now serves as the middleman for almost everything – may it be on ride-sharing services, social networking platforms, and online short-term lodging services, said Commissioner Raymund Liboro of the National Privacy Commission (NPC).

    "We took away the middleman in everything we do [and replaced it with our] personal data," said Liboro during the Social Good Summit on Saturday, September 16, in Taguig City.

    While the internet brings with it a lot of benefits and advantages, it also has the capacity to put people in danger, he said.

    Emphasizing the importance of protecting one's private information online, he cited instances when the power of technology caused more harm than good. 

    Just last year, the Philippine Commission on Elections was hacked and resulted in the leak of citizens' private information: birthdates, fingerprint data, addresses, citizenship information, passport information, and other valuable personal data. (READ: Website leaks Philippine voter data )

    Liboro also cited another case of failure of data privacy when the user's information of the dating website Ashley Madison was leaked, causing suicides among involved people. 

    With this kind of environment, he stressed the importance of the right of everyone to have their private information secure. 

    The NPC is a government agency that seeks to uphold and protect the right to privacy, and at the same time ensure free flow of information to help spur innovation.

    Liboro reminded the rights of a data subject when their private information is at stake:

    • Right to data portability
    • Right to object
    • Right to be informed
    • RIght to have access
    • Right to correct/ rectify
    • Right to block/remove
    • Right to complain

    The Philippines also has the Data Privacy Act of 2012, which gives the control of information back to the owner. 

    The law recognizes "the vital role of information and communications technology in nation-building and its inherent obligation to ensure that personal information in information and communications systems in the government and in the private sector are secured and protected,"

    He added that this "law is a 21st-century law that protects one's 21st-century rights". Aside from the Data Privacy Act, the country also has the Cybercrime Prevention Act, Anti-Photo and Video Voyeurism Act, and E-Commerce Act to ensure the protection of people's online rights. 

    Tips

    To prevent problems involving private information, Liboro gave simple and practical tips that can help citizens safeguard their information in the digital world. 

    • Create strong passwords
    • Lock your devices
    • Make sure there is an "https" on the browser address bar
    • Do not log in to personal accounts using public WFi
    • Install anti-virus software and update it regularly
    • Clean up your Facebook groups
    • Set up your Facebook privacy group settings
    • Don't be too public

     –Rappler.com


    0 0

    FARMING. Volunteers use social media to 'raise the stature' of Filipino farmers and farming, as well as promote 'mindful consumption.'

    MANILA, Philippines – Amid ongoing modernization, a local group aims to “raise the stature” of farming and Filipino farmers by raising awareness on agriculture, climate change, and “mindful” food consumption, using social media.

    Ryan Bestre from the #IAmHampasLupa Ecological Agriculture Movement said awareness is still crucial in making action happen. And what better way to do that than by maximizing the power of social media for the public good?

    “The group tries to raise awareness on all these interrelated issues. What do we do? We harness the power of social media. So millennial. We use blogs, picture stories, FB Live. As cliché as it may sound, raising awareness is still the first step that could nudge people into action,” Bestre said at the 2017 Social Good Summit held on Saturday, September 16.

    “Aside from social media campaigns, we also partner with organizations like Greenpeace, which actively supports us to come up with related events,” he added.

    Bestre said the term “hampas lupa” has long had negative connotations associated with poverty and “good for nothing” people. But what people don’t realize, he said, is its direct translation is highly apt for farming: “till the soil.”

    “'Hampas lupa' means tilling the land. This is what our farmers do. Nothing wrong with that. This is what our group is trying to change, the negative perception towards farming and farmers,” Bestre said.

    The group also promotes “ecological agriculture,” which aims to lessen farming’s negative impact on the environment.

    “We promote ecological agriculture which is a climate-resilient way of farming [that] doesn’t make use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides,” Bestre said.

    No food wastage

    Aside from this, the group also raises awareness of mindful and sustainable consumption, as the issue is closely related to farming and climate change.

    In fact, the group is part of the People’s Food Movement, which is set to file a comprehensive food policy bill before the Office of the President next week, said Bestre.

    “Due to climate change there [is] more frequent occurrence of typhoons and droughts which negatively impact food production and consumers like you and me. We are so disconnected to the Earth. We lost connection to the food we eat, how it is made, and where it comes from,” Bestre said.

    He said there is more than enough food in the world but due to food wastage, inequalities continue to exist. With 30% of the world’s food getting wasted, Bestre said there are one billion people suffering from hunger while another billion suffer from obesity.

    It does not take much to help the campaign. Ordinary Filipinos can start by being mindful of their individual eating habits, he said.

    "Start by appreciating your food and be more mindful with the food you eat. Eat more fruits and vegetables. Your body will thank you – and the environment too,” Bestre said.

    Studies have shown that when people have a mainly meat-based diet, they contribute more to climate change. Giving up meat for one meal saves enough carbon emissions to boil a kettle 388 times. (READ: How you can reduce your carbon footprint)

    Filipinos could also try to grow their own food through urban or container gardening.

    “Please, please don't waste [food]. Try to grow your own food through urban or container gardening. We have a broken food system, it’s in our hands to fix it. Whenever we eat, we contribute to the tilling of the land. We are all hampas lupa," he said.– Rappler.com


    0 0

    HOPE. Father Flavie Villanueva tells a story about Andre Janssen Kalinga Center during Rappler's Social Good Summit on September 16, 2017. Rappler photo

    MANILA, Philippines – Father Flavie Villanueva urged participants of the Social Good Summit (SGS) on Saturday, September 16, to give hope to the poorest Filipinos in the face of the troubles the Philippines is facing today. 

    Villanueva is the founder of the Arnold Janssen Kalinga (Kain at Ligo nang Ayos) Center, an institution established in Manila to provide services for the poor. 

    During the SGS, Villanueva recounted the story of a half-naked boy who once showed up at their center, with despair in his eyes. He gave the boy, named Binbin, a chance to bathe.  

    "I knelt down and scrubbed his feet and tears slowly were falling from my eyes: Bakit may ganito? (Why is this happening?)" Villanueva said.  

    After he gave Binbin a bath, Villanueva said he "saw Binbin, who was [initially] frowning, scared, but this time, facing the mirror with a smile."

    Villanueva then stressed the importance of hope. "Once you have embraced that hope, once that you've been embraced as well by that hope, be a hope to the poorest of the poor. There are so many around you."

    "Try to see who is the most hopeless around you, and be that hope to that person. When the time comes when your country would need you because it has been conquered by tyranny, and the democracy is being tested, I hope that you would also be that hope. Your country needs you," he added. – Rappler.com 


    0 0

    WINNER. Alex Austria and Keisha Mayuga talk about their project, LawKo, during Rappler's Social Good Summit on September 16, 2017.

    MANILA, Philippines – Out of the 4 teams that made it to the finals of this year's #HackSociety, LawKo stood out among the rest. (READ: Standout solutions: The winning ideas from #HackSociety 2017)

    HackSociety is an ideathon that aims to crowdsource "hacks" or solutions to society's problems.

    LawKo, a Facebook chatbot, aims to bridge the knowledge gap between a complicated legal system and the Filipino public.

    Legal processes and information can be hard to understand, especially for those with limited knowledge of how the government actually works.

    Just last September 13, social media users expressed alarm after Quezon City police suddenly conducted inspections in bars along Katipunan Avenue. The police later said that barangay officials asked for the inspections, though concerns were raised over rights of citizens during such situations.

    LawKo aims to keep the public informed by serving as an accessible "one-stop shop" that can address questions about legal processes as well as government processes.

    Instead of complex terms and legalese, the chatbot will present topics on civil procedure, criminal procedure, and other pertinent law topics in a way that's more understandable to the average Filipino user.

    The chatbot can answer questions on legal procedures and make the information easier to understand. It will be able to tell users where to file a case and when to file a case, as well as give guidance on next steps in the legal process.

    It does not aim to solve cases or give specific legal advice, but rather aims to be able to direct users to relevant offices and courts.

    Amid fears over the spate of killings in the country, there is also a greater need for ordinary citizens to understand the legal processes and laws that can protect them.

    "Legal processes shouldn't be this hard to understand. Through these dark times, LawKo aims to shed light for the ordinary citizen," said Alex Austria, co-creator of the chatbot.

    LawKo can also provide information on common transactions, such as the process of obtaining a business permit or applying for a driver's license.

    The topics are presented in a simple format. Based on options that will be presented by the chatbot, users can just click, type, and select which procedure they would like to know more about. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    DRILL. In this file photo, police and civilian employees evacuate from the Quezon City Police District (QCPD) headquarters as they participate in the nationwide simultaneous earthquake drill in Quezon City on March 31, 2017. Photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – There will be mass movement of people in the streets on September 21 but not all of them will have a political agenda.

     

    For a generation of Filipinos, September 21 is remembered every year for that night in 1972 when then President Ferdinand Marcos officially announced he put the whole country under martial law.

    On Thursday though, the whole country will again plunge into activity as the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Center (NDRRMC) scheduled the 3rd Nationwide Simultaneous Earthquake Drill (NSED) on that day.

    The ceremonial venue this year for the earthquake drill will be the Strike Gymnasium in Bacoor City, Cavite.

    "Inaanyayahan natin ang bawat isa sa September 21, 2 p.m., sabay-sabay tayong mag-duck, cover, and hold," Office of Civil Defense spokesperson Romina Marasigan said. (We would like to invite everyone on September 21, 2 pm, to join us to duck, cover and hold)

    Mobilization

    Thr usual political rallies which will commemorate the declaration of martial law 45 years ago are also expected to be more passionate, with no less than President Rodrigo Duterte saying he was considering suspending government work and classes in Metro Manila.

    "This early, I am announcing that I am ordering a holiday para walang masaktan, walang ano kung may demonstration diyan, magkagulo," he said in an interview with PTV on September 14. (So that no one gets hurt if there is a demonstration there and it gets messy) 

    Earthquake preparedness

    The quarterly simultaneous earthquake drill is held to test the preparedness and workflows of all government units in case a strong earthquake strikes Metro Manila.

    According to the Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS), the movement of the West Valley Fault that is expected to happen within our lifetime is estimated to cause a 7.2 magnitude quake in Metro Manila and neighboring cities and towns.  (READ: Preparing your family for an earthquake)

    At least 35,000 people could die and thousands more injured, the study estimated. (READ: INFOGRAPHIC: How powerful is a magnitude 7.2 earthquake)

    To spread awareness and start earthquake preparedness at homes and workplaces, NDRRMC also encouraged netizens to harness social media in influencing their friends to participate in the earthquake drill.  The official hashtag for this year's third NSED is #BidaAngHanda. – Rappler.com

    Share your photos during the nationwide earthquake drill on agos.rappler.com/map

     


    0 0

    The following is the speech of actor and environmentalist John Arcilla during the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit at Samsung Hall, SM Aura on Saturday, September 16.

    Where do we want to bring this country? Where do you want to bring this planet? We are social beings whether we like it or not. It is not a decision. It is not a choice. It is what we are. It is nature.

    Maybe you want to consider yourself an individualist? Or opted to be called as one. "Do your thing and I'll do mine. Thank you"? It won't happen.

    Aren't you eating? Aren't we all eating our meals? Don't you visit banks or a cafe? Aren't you dreaming of a nice house or travelling to an amazing place, even alone? (WATCH: Innovate with Purpose: Leave No One Behind #2030NOW)

    Well, thanks to those who cooked the food for you or if you cook it yourself. Thank God to those farmers who toiled their sweats out just to grow those crops you have cooked today; and to those boatmen and women, and helpers who brought these crops to your pan; or to your personal favorite grocery store. (WATCH: 2017 #InspireCourage +SocialGood stories)

    Thanks to that Grab service who brought you to your office or bank or cafe, he may be annoying but you've survived it and life goes on...

    Thanks to those architects and laborers who built our houses. Thanks to those creator of Facebook and other social medai platforms and all their staff who keep on creating innovations for you to enjoy, or express your significant daily creeds and "whew" rants.

    We are surrounded by people whether we choose it or not. You are not alone and they are not, too! That farmer just bought a new book for his son now and it came from the money that you've just put in the cycle. That boatman just bought medicine for his wife now and that Grab manong just learned lessons from you today or vice versa.

    No one is alone. There is no escape. Everything that will happen around you and to your society will happen to you. Everything you'll do and will not do will affect the people around you. (READ: #MovePH: How social media and technology are changing you)

    So caring is such a natural thing. The cycle of giving back and receiving or getting is natural. Being uncaring is perverse. It is like you are trying not to eat for life.

    Being nice is not a big deal too. It is as natural as waking up and resting, to recuperate, or to unwind. 

    We don't need to underline kindness – it is actually our purpose – unkindness is unnatural. When someone is less privileged or weaker than you, you naturally send compassion – a hand, a token, a signal of sympathy or love. They may be your family, your siblings, neighbors, your dog, or plants.

    We are interconnected. (READ: Social media for social change)

    It means we cannot just do anything, say anything, post anything without thinking of its effect to someone in your circle or to a group of people who will read it. Choosing words to say is not hypocrisy. I think it is prudence. It is polite. It is human. I believe that everything we do or say creates an energy, a ripple. And it will bring back another ripple or a big wave at you, at us.

    USE SOCIAL MEDIA RESPONSIBLY. Actor and environmentalist John Arcilla delivered a speech on the responsible use of social media at the 2017 Manila Social Good Summit in Samsung Hall, SM Aura on Saturday, September 16. Photo by LeAnne Jazul/Rappler

    Not making a choice is actually a choice. We are actually empowering the other side of what is bothering us. (READ: The choices before you)

    Wherever you want to bring this country, wherever you want to bring your life will be up to you. It will be up to us. Our country's progress can bring advantage to each and everyone's existence – our country's pain or demise will make us fall. It will make everybody fall.

    I don't believe in colors – politically or racially speaking. Let us not go there. Let us think of everybody's welfare. (READ: Dynasties in democracies: The political side of inequality)

    What is innovation? We benefit from it. If we will benefit from innovation as individuals but it will make us disconnected, what is innovation for? What is good technology? If technology will make us dull, non-analytical, and irresponsible, what is technology for?

    Why can't we innovate on how to fix relationships? An approach that is something new but the value is intact. How about technology to make us close as human beings instead of prompting hate culture? Or worse, divided as a nation, divided as citizens of this planet?

    I think it is better to use innovation and technology for the benefit of everyone. Let us promote compassion, good values, gratitude, peace and harmony through our innovations and newfound technologies.

    If we think we don't want to be part of the movers to push the innovation "with a heart," at least let us learn the virtue of gratitude. Let us all be thankful to these developments and cycle of life which were actually brought by other human beings that we don't bother to notice or we don't see but are making our lives better. Gratitude and getting lessons from the past can push the evolution of humanity forward, depending on how we use it.

    This is the very reason why I think being sensible is a responsibility. Our neglect and apathy will bring everyone in a lonely land sooner or sooner.

    Let us innovate with purpose. When we post something, think of the welfare of others. Think of the positive energy it can create. Think of the people who will be inspired. Think of a society that you want to have. A planet that we want to be safe to live in.

    When we innovate, or when we upgrade, ask ourselves – "What is it for?"

    We are the highest form of animals, we just don't rant just because we like it. If that is our disposition, we should not blame anyone why there is a culture of hate or killings that is going on around us all over the planet and all over our nation these days. We have created the environment that we have now. We are the ones who created the country that we have now. We brought our planet to where it is now in the name of climate change and extinction.

    Next time, when we think of innovation and technology, think again. What kind of person do I want to be? Where do I want to bring this country? What do I want this planet to be made of? – Rappler.com

    John Arcilla is an actor and environmentalist best known for playing the role of the protagonist Antonio Luna in the historical epic film Heneral Luna.


    0 0

    HUMAN RIGHTS. Superintendent Oliver Tanseco says road safety is a human rights issue, especially in the Philippines.

    MANILA, Philippines – Road safety, or the absence of it, is a human rights issue, especially in the Philippines. (READ: Road crash numbers: Looking at the data sources)

    Superintendent Oliver Sy Tanseco of the Philippine National Police (PNP) Highway Patrol Group said this, as he cited 1.25 million deaths in the country and 50 million worldwide yearly due to vehicle crash.

    “In our country, being one of the low-income countries, road crashes are a major concern. It’s a world health issue,” Tanseco said during the 2017 Social Good Summit on Saturday, September 16.

    Tanseco also said people aged 15 to 29 years old are more susceptible to dying from road crash.

    In 2016, he said, the Philippine Statistics Authority reported 10,000 deaths due to road crashes, while the PNP reported 2,100 deaths. But these numbers, he said, are way lower than reality.

    “It is still underreported. For one thing, we have no national database system for road crashes. If we have complete data, believe me, road crashes are a major concern for everyone in the country,” he said.

    Tanseco also said statistics should not just be limited to the actual deaths on site, on the way to the hospital, or those declared dead on arrival.

    “All road crashes-related deaths [should be included], meaning, day 1 up to 30 days then on,” he said, citing victims who later died due to injuries.

    How to keep roads safe

    While the government is working to keep roads safe, Tanseco said the public has to assert their right.

    The World Health Organization has set a target of reducing by half the number of deaths due to crashes by 2020 or barely 3 years from now.

    “You have to assert your right. Road safety is a human rights issue. Look at the data, we are not able to reduce it,” Tanseco said.

    He then explained why there is no such thing as a traffic or road “accident.” Accidents are unforeseen and unpredictable instances while vehicle crashes are predictable and can be controlled.

    Tanseco, also a lawyer, said the two meanings have legal implications. In legal cases, an accident means there is no intent on the part of the suspect or perpetrator, thereby lessening his responsibility.

    Tanseco said one way to keep the roads safe is by reducing driving speed by 5%. This, he said, would reduce all crashes by one-third.

    He also advised the public to use seatbelts and to exercise discipline on the road.

    Tanseco ended his speech by saying not all policemen are killers, an apparent reference to the controversies hounding the police force amid an ongoing bloody drug war.

    Marami pa po kagaya namin, concerned sa safety nyo, sa rights 'nyo.” Tanseco said. (There are still many police like us who are concerned about your safety, your rights.)– Rappler.com


    0 0

    FOR PEACE. Around 700 students participated in the 6th Football for Peace Festival in Luuk, Sulu. Photos courtesy of Col. Stephen Cabanlet

    MANILA, Philippines– The founder of the Football for Peace Movement has always aimed to highlight peace and hope amid war in Mindanao through sports. On its 6th year, the mission of Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Cabanlet through his project remains the same.

    Members of the Philippine Marine Corps have been teaching football to the youth of Sulu to hopefully pass on to them important values like discipline. (READ: Marines' Football for Peace brings hope to Southern Mindanao)

    “We want to empower the children to become leaders someday,” Cabanlet said in a phone interview. (READ: How football teaches kids from conflict areas to dream)

    This year, the 6th Football for Peace festival consisted of different activities. There was a kite festival with the theme “Soar high, Sulu.” 

    There were also medical missions and the distribution of school kits to students.

    “We did not only hold a football cup but we also provided capacity building and medical services,” Cabanlet said.

    Football for Peace was the highlight of the 3-day event in Luuk town in Sulu, where 700 students participated. The festival went on from September 14 to 17. 

    "It will not grow without the support from other stakeholders who believe in the advocacy," Cabanlet said in Filipino. 

    This year, Cabanlet and his team provided medical assistance on the sidelines of the football tournament, including minor surgeries.

    Cataract Foundation Philippines, Incorporated partnered with Cabanlet's group and provided free eye surgery and cataract removal. About  700 pairs of eyeglasses were distributed as well.

    The medical mission also included a dental mission which treated 220 patients.

    Football for Peace won a Quill Award for Communication in March 2015, in recognition of the efforts of the Philippine Marine Corps to bring out the best in young people in conflict areas. – Rappler.com 

     

     

     

     

     


    0 0

    NEW REVOLUTION. DTI-ARMM Secretary Anwar Malang said he wants to start a revolution, not an armed revolution, but an economic one. Photo by Aika Rey/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – The Department of Trade and Industry-Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (DTI-ARMM) launched on Monday, September 18, a social enterprise division to promote entrepreneurship in the resource-rich but  "poorest of the poor region" of the country. 

    DTI-ARMM Secretary Anwar Malang said he wanted to promote programs that would be sustainable given the current situation in the region.

    "ARMM is still the poorest of poor region. We have the poorest of the poor province. We have all the resources. But why? Political issues. The Bangsamoro issue is not yet settled up until now," said Malang.

    Decades of insurgency and terrorism have hampered development in Mindanao. (READ: FAST FACTS: Poverty in Mindanao)

    According to the secretary, social entrepreneurship is a paradigm shift from the usual programs of the government. (READ: Giving back to the poor: Why social enterprises matter)

    "All programs of the government are 'dole outs.' What does that mean for the people? They don't care much. They don't see it as capital," he said.

    He said that one business locals can invest in is the Halal market given that ARMM is composed mostly of Muslims.

    Malang is hopeful that through the social enterprise, Mindanaoans will find a way to move out of poverty.

    "If we achieve freedom from hunger, then maybe we can empower our people," he said.

    Rebuild Marawi

    For a Maranao, Solaiman Matonding of the Metro Marawi Chamber of Commerce and Industry said that social entrepreneurship could be a way to rebuild the city.

    "Important ang kabuhayan. Kung merong program para magkaron ng gana ang mga tao, mabuti. Kasi sa Marawi, nasira lahat. Pano ibalik 'yon? We really need help financially and a guide for us," Matonding said. (Livelihood is important. If there is a program that will bring the motivation among people, better. In Marawi, everything was torn down.)

    "Nasira 'yung buhay mo, kailangan merong gumising para magising ang mga tao at ma-motivate," he added. (If your life was broken, you need something to wake people up and that motivates them.)

    Matonding said that the programs can come in once Marawi is in rehabilitation phase.

    Last May, fighting erupted between government forces and local terrorist groups. The incident led President Rodrigo Duterte to declare martial law in all of Mindanao. (READ: Why martial law is not the solution to Mindanao's woes)

    The most populous city in ARMM, Marawi City was now a ghost town due to the war. (READ: The final push: Inside the Marawi battle area)

    "Maranaos are industrious people. They will survive," he said.

    Ideation camp

    Apart from the new division, the department also launched an "ideation camp" that aims to crowdsource programs that can be implemented in the region.

    DTI-ARMM in partnership with British Council under the under the European Union-funded Strengthening Civil Society Participation in Social Enterprise Education and Development (CSO-SEED) launched "Local Changes: Ideas to Impact" contest which would ask applicants to submit a proposal to address a social problem.

    British Council's Head of Society Angel Flores said that it's high time to ask the communities what kind of changes the locals wanted to see.

    "The ideation camp is asking communities to determine the changes they want to see in their own community. What we are trying to do here is to get ideas from them," she said.

    Flores said social enterprises are usually in the metropolitan areas. "Those who were left behind don't get support from an innovative program," she said. (READ: Recruiting millennials: A challenge for social enterprises)

    Applications opened on Monday. Flores said the camp is set to happen in November.

    "The young people in the (ARMM) region should be the new breed of entrepreneurs," she said.

    According to data from the Philippine Statistics Authority, 4 out of top 5 poorest regions in the Philippines are in Mindanao. 

    Poverty incidence in ARMM is at 59%, double the national average of 26.3%. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    MANILA, Philippines – (UPDATED) Why schedule the earthquake drill during the anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law in the Philippines?

    This is the question being raised by netizens, following the announcement of the National Disaster
    Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) about the 3rd Quarter Nationwide Simultaneous Earthquake Drill (NSED) scheduled on Thursday, September 21.

    Netizens noticed that the drill, which was announced less than a week before the activity, was set on the same day of the country's commemoration of the declaration of Martial Law 45 years ago. 

    Office of Civil Defense Spokesperson Mina Marasigan, however, clarified that the earthquake drill to be held on Thursday does not intend to undermine or divert attention from the commemoration activities.

    "We just thought of September 21, notwithstanding kung ano man ang sine-celebrate noong araw na iyon, kung ano man iyon ng history ang natatak doon," she told the media on Monday. (We just thought of September 21 notwithstanding the historical events attached to that day.)

    Marasigan further explained that the quarterly earthquake drill which aims to test the preparedness and workflows of all government units in case a strong earthquake strikes Metro Manila is usually held on the last month of each quarter. 

    On Tuesday morning, September 19, NDRRMC announced that they will be postponing the earthquake drill following President Rodrigo Duterte's announcement to suspend government work and classes on Thursday. 

    Netizens' reaction

    In a reply to the NDRRMC's tweet, James Romer Vilena tweeted,"Pwede namang sa ibang araw 'tong drill na 'to ah kasi may mga rallies na scheduled on September 21 to commemorate Martial Law anniversary." 

    (Why not hold the earthquake drill the next day because there are scheduled rallies on September 21 to commemorate Martial Law anniversary.) 

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-cards="hidden" data-partner="tweetdeck"><p lang="tl" dir="ltr">Pwede namang sa ibang araw tong drill na to ah kasi may mga rallies na scheduled on September 21 to commemorate Martial Law anniversary.</p>&mdash; James Romer Velina (@JamesVelinaLXIX) <a href="https://twitter.com/JamesVelinaLXIX/status/909628919673847809">September 18, 2017</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

    In a tweet, Movement Against Tyranny said, "Earthquake drill on #September 21? No problem, says @TheMovementPHL convenor Sr Mary John Manazan. Quirino Grandstand best place to gather!"

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Earthquake drill on <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/September21?src=hash">#September21</a>? No problem, says <a href="https://twitter.com/TheMovementPHL">@TheMovementPHL</a> convenor Sr Mary John Manazan. Quirino Grandstand best place to gather!</p>&mdash; Mvnt Against Tyranny (@TheMovementPHL) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheMovementPHL/status/909594007268761601">September 18, 2017</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source} 

    Protesters from various activist groups are set to flood the streets of Metro Manila and cities around the country to condemn the ruthless human rights violations after dictator Ferdinand Marcos put the whole country under Martial Law on September 21, 1972. 

    Political rallies are also expected to be massive, prompting President Rodrigo Duterte to suspend government work and classes in Metro Manila. He said that the day will be a "national day of protest."

    {source}

    <a class="twitter-timeline" data-partner="tweetdeck" href="https://twitter.com/MovePH/timelines/909745449371705349">Netizens on 3rd NSED 2017 - Curated tweets by MovePH</a> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

    The movement of the West Valley Fault will cause a 7.2-magnitude earthquake that is estimated to kill about 35,000 people, a study suggests. (READ: INFOGRAPHIC: How powerful is a 7.2-magnitude earthquake?)

    The NDRRMC urged netizens to harness social media in influencing their friends to participate in the earthquake drill. The official hashtag for this year's third NSED is #BidaAngHanda. – Rappler.com


    0 0

    EARTHQUAKE DRILL. In this file photo, a worker activates the siren as employees cover their heads while they run for safety during the Nationwide Earthquake Drill, at the Quezon City Hall grounds, March 31, 2017. File photo by Nelson Vera/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) called off the national simultaneous earthquake drill (NSED) that was initially scheduled on Thursday, September 21, opting to postpone the activity to a later date.

    The NDRRMC ordered the postponement after President Rodrigo Duterte suspended government work and classes on September 21, declaring it as a "national day of protest."

    "In compliance with the President's pronouncement for suspension of government work and classes, we decided to postpone it to [a] later date for maximum participation," NDRRMC Executive Director Ricardo Jalad confirmed in a text message to Rappler.

    Earlier, netizens expressed concern over the untimely schedule of the earthquake drill. It was set on the same day when various political groups are expected to hold rallies to mark the declaration of martial law 45 years ago.

    Office of Civil Defense Spokesperson Mina Marasigan earlier clarified that the earthquake drill does not aim to undermine the commemoration activities happening on the same day. 

    "We just thought of September 21, notwithstanding kung ano man ang sine-celebrate noong araw na iyon, kung ano man iyon ng history ang natatak doon," she told the media on Monday, September 18.

    (We just thought of September 21 notwithstanding the historical events attached to that day.)

    Marasigan said on Tuesday, September 19, that they have not yet decided on a new schedule. 

    "The President has made a declaration na walang klase and napili ay national high schools. So hindi na lang namin tinuloy. In fact, we wanted to push through but to give way na lang din," she added.

    (The President declared the suspension of classes and national high schools are covered so we decided to postpone the earthquake drill. In fact, we wanted to push through but we decided otherwise to give way.)

    The quarterly nationwide earthquake drill is held to test the preparedness and workflows of all government units in case a strong earthquake strikes Metro Manila.

    Based on a 2014 study, the movement of the West Valley Fault that is expected to happen within our lifetime is estimated to cause a magnitude 7.2 quake in Metro Manila and neighboring cities and towns. (READ: Preparing your family for an earthquake– Rappler.com  


    0 0

    MANILA, Philippines – Various groups will hold mass protests across the country on Thursday, September 21, to remember the declaration of martial law 45 years ago.

    Several activities are also lined up all week to further debunk the myths of Martial Law under the dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

    On September 23, 1972, the former president appeared on television and by virtue of Proclamation 1081 supposedly signed on September 21, formally declared martial law nationwide. (READ: Marcos’ martial law orders)

    Based on the stories of torture, repression, and enforced disappearances of activists during that time, the years that followed were considered among the darkest for the Philippines. During this period, the country also plunged into debt, racking up $24.4 billion in debt by 1982. (READ: Marcos years marked 'golden age' of PH economy? Look at the data)

    President Rodrigo Duterte suspended government work and classes in public schools on Thursday and declared it a "national day of protest."

    Here is a running list of activities recalling the declaration of Martial Law this week:

    Wednesday, September 20

    • Metro Manila
      • 5 pm to 6:30 pm: "Organizing Dissent: A workshop on activism and the specter of martial law" at Faber 101 at the Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City 

    Thursday, September 21

    • Metro Manila
      • 8 am to 12 pm: Martial law noon... at ngayon? A millennial throwback at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani Auditorium 
      • 10:30 am: SB park, Batasan High School
      • 1 pm: Picket along Quezon Avenue, corner EDSA, organized by CAMB, Block Marcos, Kalipunan, iDefend
      • 2 pm: Misa ng mamayanan organized by #TindigPilipinas
      • 2 pm: Ecunemical service at the Bantayog ng mga Bayani in Quezon City, organized by CAMB, Block Marcos, Kalipunan, iDefend
      • 4 to 8 pm: "Stop the killings! Never again to tyranny and dictatorship!" at the Rizal Park
      • 4 pm: Martsa ng mamamayan from UP Chapel to the Commission on Human Rights; from Quezon City Hall to the Commission on Human Rights
      • 5 pm: Unveiling of Ka Pepe Dikno's statue at the Commission on Human Rights
      • 9 pm: Makibaka! Don't get takot: An improv show at Pineapple lab in Makati
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: University of the Philippines - Diliman, University of the Philippines - Manila, University of Santo Tomas, Far Eastern University, Ateneo de Manila University, De La Salle University,  St. Scholastica University, College of Saint Benilde, Philippine Normal University, Technological University of the Philippines, Polytechnic University of the Philippines, EARIST 
    • Ilocos Region
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: Pangasinan State University
    • Cagayan Valley
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: Cagayan State University Isabela State University, Nueva Vizcaya State University
    • Cordillera Administrative Region
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: University of the Philippines - Baguio, University of the Cordilleras, Saint Louis University
    • Central Luzon
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: UP Pampanga, Bulacan State University
    • Calabarzon
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: UP Los Baños
    • Mimaropa
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: Palawan State University
    • Bicol Region
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: Ateneo de Naga University
    • Central Visayas
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: UP Visayas - Cebu, University of San Carlos, Cebu Normal University
    • Western Visayas
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: UP Visayas - Miag-ao, Western Visayas State University, Iloilo Science and Technology University, Central Philippine University
    • Eastern Visayas
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny:  UP Visayas - Tacloban, UPM SHS Palo, Leyte
    • Northern Midnanao
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: MSU Iligan
    • Davao Region
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: UP Mindanao, Assumption College, University of Southeastern Philippines
    • Soccksargen
      • Mobilizations organized by #YouthActNow against tyranny: Holy Trinity College General Santos, Mindanao Polytechnic College, MSU General Santos, Notre Dame of Marbel, UP Mindanao SHS Koronadal

    September 22, 2017

    • 5 to 6:30 pm: "Remembering martial law, renouncing extrajudicial killings: Voices from Ateneo and beyond" at Escaler Hall in the Ateneo de Manila University 
    • 5 to 7 pm: "Bakas ng Dahas" at Leong Hall in the Ateneo de Manila University
    • 7:30 to 8:30 pm: Community mass in solidarity with the victims and in support of Caloocan sanctuary at the Church of the Gesu in the Ateneo de Manila University

    September 23, 2017

    • Start of 40 days of prayer led by the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines

    September 30, 2017

    • 6 pm: Brats meet-up: A sit-down of various youth groups against dictatorship, tyranny, and injustice at Commune, Makati 

    – Rappler.com


older | 1 | .... | 51 | 52 | (Page 53) | 54 | 55 | .... | 108 | newer