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    MANILA, Philippines – Thousands of members and supporters of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) community marched on the streets of Plaza de los Alcaldes in Marikina City on Saturday, June 24, for the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March.

    This year's pride march hoped to unite the community, as well as LGBTQ+ allies, friends, and family, in fighting for equal rights and resolving discrimination against the gay community.

    See the highlights of this year's event:

    According to Loreen Ordono, the Pride March also serves as a "platform where they can manifest legitimate concerns" such as the passage of House Bill No. 4982 or the Sexual Orientation Gender Identity Expression (SOGIE) Equality Act.

    Senator Risa Hontiveros, a staunch advocate of women and LGBTQ+ rights, gave the keynote speech. "We march for those who can't. Dear friends, love is the currency of our struggle!" said Hontiveros.

    Actress Nora Aunor also joined the Pride March.

    Different groups put up booths that gave away free human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and condoms.

    While some see the march as an avenue where members of the LGBT community can voice out their concerns, others see it as a safe space where they can express themselves without prejudice.

    At the end of the day, #LoveWins. – with Vee Salazar/Rappler.com


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    2017 PRIDE MARCH. Senator Risa Hontiveros delivered the keynote speech at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March. Photo by Martin San Diego/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Senator Risa Hontiveros took a swipe at President Rodrigo Duterte on Saturday, June 24 at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride march for "failing the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community".

    "The macho politics of Duterte have failed LGBT hopes. While he paraded himself as an ally during the campaign season, promising same-sex marriage in the Philippines, he turned back on his promise not one year in his term," said Hontiveros during her keynote speech at the event.

    In March, Duterte said the Philippines cannot legalize same-sex marriage during his official visit in Myanmar.

    This is contrary to his stance during the 2016 campaign period, when he expressed openness to possible legislation allowing same-sex marriage.

    Meanwhile, Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez, one of Duterte's staunchest allies, said last October that he would push for same-sex civil marriage in the Philippines.

    "The change he has promised has been replaced by an endless parade of strongman tactics that prey on the vulnerable," she said.

    According to Hontiveros, for a country that is considered liberal, "the Philippines still has a long way to go to achieve rights for the LGBT."

    "We march for those who can't. Dear friends, love is the currency of our stuggle," she said.

    Call for equal rights

    Hontiveros also called on the public to march for the death of Filipino transgender Jeffrey "Jennifer" Laude and to create safe spaces for the community.

    According to Trans Murder Monitoring project, the Philippines is part of the top 10 countries with the most reported killing of trans- and gender-diverse people at 40 since 2008. In Asia, the country ranks second next to India at 55.

    "(The numbers) represent a deadly and irrational prejudice against those who do not conform to the traditional notion of sexual identity and orientation and a deep-seated hate that we refuse to acknowledge and address," she said.

    Meanwhile, Vice President Leni Robredo also told the public to push for the rights of the LGBTQ+ community.

    "Patuloy nating tutukan ang pagsulong sa karapatan ng LGBT laban sa lahat ng uri ng diskriminasyon at karahasang nakikita pa rin natin sa ating kapaligiran," Robredo said in a video message posted on her official Facebook account.

    (We will continue to focus on LGBT's advancement of rights against all forms of discrimination and violence that we still see in our environment)

    {source}

    <iframe src="https://web.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fweb.facebook.com%2FVPPilipinas%2Fvideos%2F1395969823823336%2F&show_text=0&width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allowFullScreen="true"></iframe>

    {/source}

    "Sama-sama tayong kumilos upang suportahan ang Anti-Discrimination Bill at ang pagbigay ng pantay na karapatan sa edukasyon, economic opportunities at health services lalo na dahil sa dumadaming kaso ng HIV/AIDS," she added.

    (Let's work together to support the Anti-Discrimination Bill and to provide equal rights to education, economic opportunities and health services especially due to the increasing number of HIV/AIDS cases.)

    Almost two decades have passed before an anti-discrimination bill was debated in Congress. (READ: The long road to an LGBT anti-discrimination law)

    In March, the House of Representatives kicked off the hearing on House Bill No. 4982 or the Sexual Orientation Gender Identity Expression (SOGIE) Equality Act.

    The bill pushes for equal opportunities for the LGBT community but it does not seek to legalize same-sex marriage.

    Metro Manila Pride

    The pride march is not only an event to urge policymakers to push for the bill but also to celebrate diversity.

    "Sinusulong pa rin namin ang Anti-discrimination bill na finile nila Kaka Bag-ao and our other friends in Congress and Senate. Pero ito, we're here to celebrate diversity and pride of the LGBT groups," Danton Remoto, Ang Ladlad party-list's chairman, told Rappler.

    (We are pushing for the [passage] of the Anti-discrimination bill that was filed by Kaka Bag-ao and our other friends in Congress and Senate. But we're also here to celebrate diversity and pride of the LGBT groups.)

    "There are lot of young people who joined the parade. We see the next generation of activists and advocates," Remoto added.

    The 2017 Metro Manila Pride March was held at Plaza de los Alcaldes in Marikina City on Saturday. (IN PHOTOS: #HereTogether at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride march)

    This year's theme is "Here Together" in the hopes of bringing together supporters and members of the LGBTQ+ community to fight to equal rights and resolve discrimination against the gay community. (IN PHOTOS: Why we're #HereTogether)

    Organizers estimated around 5,000 people marched along the streets of the city. – with a report from LeAnne Jazul/Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – Clad in colorful outfits, several groups and individuals attended the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March.

    Members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) community walked around Plaza de los Alcaldes in Marikina City on Saturday, June 24, to celebrate diversity and unity.

    Know more about why they attended the march:

    Why we're here

    "I've been a part of the Pride March for a good 4 years and each time I make sure that I dress up for a message. I refuse to be bound by social norms that's why I'm all tied up right now. People are not to be labeled and people are not bound to follow social norms."

    – Paolo Dumlao, performance artist. He's a pansexual who believes that personality is more important than what is between the legs.

    "I'm a straight ally fighting for LGBT rights and feminism. I came here to show my support and love for diversity and unity."

    – Ina Coronel, 18, student

    "I'm here because I love gay people because they are friendly and I want to be with my friends and people who love each other.:

    – Eidgpas Xavier, 28, from Brazil

    "Earlier this month the Secretary (of State) affirmed the US' solidarity with human rights and defenders of civil society organizations around the world and that includes the freedoms of LGBTQI persons to live with dignity and freedom and that's why we're here."

    – Griffin Lennor, Embassy of the United States of America in Manila

    On religion

    "I'm a devoted Christian, and all these people should repent for their sins lest they face God's wrath."

    – John, 20, USA

    "Lagi po nating tatandaan na ang Diyos ay laging nagmamahal. Mahal niya ang kaniyang mga nilikha dahil ito ay nanggaling sa kanya." (Let's always remember that God always loves. He loves his creations because they came from him.)

    – John Kenneth Jacinto, 22, Iglesia Filipina Independiente

    "Nandito kami para ipahayag ang katotohanan sapagkat ang katotohanan ang makapagpapalaya sa mga nandito ngayon. Ayaw ng Panginoon ng mga lesbian at homosexual dahil sinabi sa bibliya na walang lugar ang mga iyan sa kaharian ng Diyos."

    (We are here to preach the truth because the truth sets free everyone who is here now. The Lord does not like lesbians and homosexuals because it was said in the bible that there is no place for them in the Kingdom of God.)

    – Jay-R Arabaca (center), traveled 10 hours from Naga City to Marikina to speak the truth

    "We're marching here to proclaim that LGBTQ people are also God's people."

    – Noel Bordador, 53, Episcopal Church of the United States of America

    When did you realize you were gay?

    "It took me a long time to open myself to others. I realized I'm gay when I was in 3rd grade and came out only when I was in college."

    – Rogelio Tulang Jr. (left), 24

    "I realized that I'm gay when I was still young but it was hard because I was studying then in an all-boys Catholic school. Upon entering college, I realized that I should accept what I am and embrace myself."

    – Micca Tria, 20, Ateneo Doll House

    "When I was roughly 5 years old, I wasn't knowledgeable about gender identity but I knew deep inside that I was gay but denied it for several years. Then here I am, happy, (and) colorful. This is me."

    – Yabamita, 25, Pampanga

    "We knew we were gay since we were young. It's in our genes."

    – Richard and Cassiopeia from Rizal

    "Na-realize ko na bading ako noong Grade 1. Crush ko si Bobby na katabi ko na nangongopya sa akin. Nung college lang ako nag-out, nung nag-aral na ako sa Scotland."

    (I realized that I was gay when I was in Grade 1. Bobby was my crush then. He was seated beside me and copied from me. I came out when I was in college, when I studied in Scotland.)

    – Danton Remoto, 54, Chairman, Ang Ladlad

    – Rappler.com


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    INCLUSIVITY. Ian Carandang (left) advocates for inclusivity at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March. Photo by Adrianne Diaz

    MANILA, Philippines – Ian Carandang, a self-proclaimed "bear" in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) community, is a man on a mission to spread awareness about his group's advocacy known as "DiBearSity."

    A wordplay of "diversity" and "bear", DiBearSity is the message of the local LGBTQ+ group Bigger Manila which promises inclusivity.

    "Bears" include the body type of big, muscular men. Bigger Manila is an organization of "larger men and the ones that like them." According to Carandang, the advocacy is a reaction to the myth of gay beauty – the slim, tall gay man.

    "The idea of bears is that they're more inclusive," said Carandang. "Whether you're big or you're small but you like big people, we all accept them." (READ: For the LGBT community, pride is the opposite of shame)

    When Bigger Manila first started, the group was only composed of bears and chasers – the ones that are into large men.

    "DiBearSity was made to regain the ideal bear community – where everyone is invited, everyone is embraced. Whether you're a butch or a femme, you're all welcome," Carandang said.

    Striving for positivity

    The group's struggles are similar to that of other segments of the LGBTQ+ community – equal rights, marriage equality, family acceptance, work discrimination. (READ: Strength in colors: The Filipino LGBTQ community)

    "We do face discrimination. We're just the same. We're not special in that sense," said Carandang.

    However, bears are unique in their struggles when it comes to awareness.

    BIGGER MANILA. Local LGBTQ+ group Bigger Manila pushes for DiBearSity. Photo by Adrianne Diaz

    According to Carandang, many Filipinos do not realize the existence of bears. "They're surprised to see that there are these masculine, manly-looking, gym-going, power-lifting, gay men."

    Since there's a lack of awareness, said Carandang, many people fail to understand the diversity of their subgroup. (READ: Is the Philippines really gay-friendly?)

    He noted that a larger percentage of them are "naturally closeted." Carandang attributes this to the more masculine personality and larger build of the members, which is contrary to the notion of how gay people are.

    The Bigger Manila bears also strive for body positivity. "Body positivity is a big part of the bear scene," he said. "It's really just about accepting and loving yourself." (READ: When your friend is gay)

    Carandang was once the type of guy who refused to remove his shirt when swimming, afraid of getting jokes about his large physique.

    "It's very important to be at ease and be comfortable with who you are. Be at peace with who you are and enjoy it. You look great and you are awesome just the way you are," he said.

    Carandang stressed the importance of accepting yourself first and tuning out criticism from others. (READ: Manila pride: When pride is all about love)

    "Once you stop caring and stop worrying about what other people think, and just accept and cherish yourself for who you are, life becomes so much better," he added.

    Internalized homophobia

    Discrimination against members of the LGBTQ+ community comes from all sides – from non-LGBTQ people who refuse to recognize their struggles and sometimes even among the LGBTQ members themselves.

    Even for gay dating apps like Blued and Grindr, discrimination based on body types and physical looks is on full display: "No chubs. No effems. No uglies." Hanky, a similar app, lets its users "judge" and "vote" on the looks of the person before they can sign up for an account.

    A 1993 book by Alan Klein, titled Little Big Men, said gay men's obsession with muscularity resulted from the AIDS crisis, where gay men equated muscles with good health and strived to be buff by constantly working out. Thus, "the tyranny of buffness."

    2009 study also showed that gay men's bodily concerns are usually due to external factors such as the prevailing image of beauty among the LGBTQ+ community – thinness, muscularity, and attractiveness.

    In a report by the Philippine Star, Filipino gay men shared that homophobia is likely influenced by a heteronormative patriarchal society and the usual notion of gay men as flamboyant and comic. (READ: The long road to an LGBT anti-discrimination law)

    With the issue even more felt in the age of social media, events like the annual pride celebration continuously serve as a safe space for every member of the LGBTQ+ community. It is a proponent of true diversity.

    Here together

    HERE TOGETHER. Members of loveyourself, a pro-LGBT group, pose in traditional Korean attire during the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March. Photo by Martin San Diego/Rappler

    For Carandang, unity is of utmost importance. The division of the LGBTQ+ community acts as a hindrance to progress, especially in terms of legislation.

    "If we want to get something done in terms of legislation, the only way we'll do that is if we mobilize and [be] united," he said.

    "We can all be diverse. We can all have our own interests. But we all have to come together and be united, so we can get things changed," he added.

    Cultural change is key in fighting homophobia against and within the LGBTQ+ community. "How did we change [racism and sexism]? We educated ourselves. We taught each other," Carandang said. (READ: How to be a true friend to LGBT folks)

    Carandang also stressed the importance of calling people out for ignorant and insensitive statements and actions against LGBTQ+ people. But it's easier said than done.

    In order to spread "DiBearSity", Bigger Manila holds regular activities such as "My Chuva" or "My Chubby Valentine" during February and "Chubbiboo" or their own version of a Halloween party. They also plan to bring back their monthly tradition of DiBearSity nights where both bears and chasers can hang out in a safe space.

    But again, lack of awareness about the group is a problem. "In Manila, we don't really have a bear bar. In other countries, they do, like in Taiwan and Japan. But the [local] market is not strong enough to hold a regular bear bar."

    The annual pride march, in which the group regularly participates, plays an important role in strengthening unity of the community. (IN PHOTOS: #HereTogether at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride march)

    From Come Out for Love (2014), to Fight For Love (2015), to Let Love In (2016), and now Here Together, Metro Manila Pride has always been about solidarity among LGBTQ+ members and their allies. (IN PHOTOS: Why we're #HereTogether)

    True diversity, awareness, body positivity, and acceptance – these are the messages of DiBearSity and Bigger Manila that Carandang hopes will resonate with Filipinos. – Rappler.com

    Renzo Acosta was a Rappler intern.


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    SUPPORT. Freedom in Christ Ministries church apologizes on behalf of other churches that condemn the LGBT community. Photo by Clyde Jayvy Villanueva/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Christian groups marched along the streets of Marikina City to show support for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) community on Saturday, June 24.

    Among the groups present was Freedom in Christ Ministries (FICM), a Pentecostal, evangelical, and Bible-based church. FICM aims to apologize on behalf of other churches that condemn the gay community. (READ: A Christian church embraces the LGBT community)

    The group carried placards that read "I'm sorry. We're here to apologize for the ways that we as Christians have harmed the LGBT community."

    "We really try hard to educate our gays, lesbians, sisters, and brothers, that in Christ we are all equal," Mak of FICM also told Rappler.

    According to him, their church has been attending the Pride March since 2014. He said they have pledged to support the event every year.

    Aside from FICM, members of the Iglesia Filipina Independiente and the Episcopal Church of the United States of America were also seen at the Pride March. (IN PHOTOS: Why we're #HereTogether)

    Mikhail Quijano of Metro Manila Pride said seeing Christians express their support was empowering.

    "Seeing the Christian groups who came out in support of the LGBTQ+ community is a clear example of this year's theme 'Here Together,'" Quijano said.

    Protests

    While many groups marched in solidarity with the gay community, there were also some who rallied against them, citing religious reasons.

    Protesters held placards showing "It's not ok to be gay! It is a sin!" (IN PHOTOS: #HereTogether at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March)

    PROTESTS. An anti-LGBTQ+ protester holds a placard saying that to be gay is a sin. Photo by Martin San Diego/Rappler

    Another protester traveled 10 hours from Naga City in Bicol just to "preach the truth."

    "Ayaw ng Panginoon ng mga lesbian at homosexual dahil sinabi sa Bibliya na walang lugar ang mga iyan sa kaharian ng Diyos," said Jay-r Arabaca.

    (The Lord does not like lesbians and homosexuals because the Bible says there is no place for them in the Kingdom of God.)

    One tweet comparing Christian supporters and protesters got thousands of likes and retweets.

    {source}

    <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Two types of Christians in the world <a href="https://t.co/Yr6Kf61Cxh">pic.twitter.com/Yr6Kf61Cxh</a></p>&mdash; JUPA (@jmartiaga) <a href="https://twitter.com/jmartiaga/status/878546459452362752">June 24, 2017</a></blockquote>
    <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

    {/source}

     

    The 2017 Metro Manila Pride March was attended by over 5,000 participants to celebrate freedom and diversity.

    This year's theme is "Here Together" in the hopes of gathering members and supporters of the LGBTQ+ community to fight for equal rights and end discrimination. – with reports from Clyde Jayvy Villanueva / Rappler.com


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    PRIDE. Thousands join the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March called 'Here Together' on June 24, 2017 in Marikina City. Photo by Martin San Diego/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) community walked for freedom and diversity at the 2017 Metro Manila Pride March on Saturday, June 24, in Marikina City.

    Mostly in rainbow outfits, those who attended the event celebrated love and pride for the gay community. (READ: Embracing 'DiBearSity' at the Metro Manila Pride March)

    Senator Risa Hontiveros, who gave the keynote speech during the event, called on the public to stand in solidarity with the community. "We march for those who can't. Dear friends, love is the currency of our struggle," she said.

    See the highlights of the event in the video above. – with Vee Salazar and Alecs Ongcal / Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – The observance of the National Disaster Consciousness Month in July is a reminder to everyone of the need to reduce risks and be prepared for disasters. And what better way to learn about disaster preparedness than from the experts and practitioners themselves?

    On July 7-8, disaster management experts, responders, policy makers, and volunteers will gather for the first ever Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness at the Samsung Hall of SM Aura mall in Taguig.

    The summit aims to bring together key stakeholders, tackle pressing issues, and learn from good practices that mitigated risks or achieved zero casualty. Whether you are a disaster management professional, a government information officer, a business person, or a concerned citizen who is interested in learning about disaster preparedness, this summit is for you.

    Tickets to the summit are free but MovePH - Rappler’s civic engagement arm - will be accepting voluntary contributions at the entrance which will benefit the continuing development of the Agos eBayanihan platform. Agos facilitates the open sharing of critical information using social media, technology, and crowdsourcing. It is powered by Ateneo de Manila University’s eBayanihan platform.

    For those living outside Metro Manila, the summit will be livestreamed on Rappler.com. Join the #ZeroCasualty Community on Facebook to get the latest updates and behind the scenes stories from the summit.

    Day 1: #MMShakeDrill

    Day 1 of the summit begins at 1 pm and will focus on the upcoming Metro Manila Shake Drill (#MMShakeDrill), a metro-wide earthquake drill which will be held from July 14 to 17, 2017 to test the metro’s response to a possible 7.2-magnitude earthquake.

    Speakers from the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) will discuss plans for the #MMShakeDrill and what companies, schools, and the general public should do before, during and after the drill.

    Representatives of Metro Manila-based establishments, village associations, and civic groups are highly encouraged to attend Day 1 of the Summit to learn about best practices for conducting earthquake drills in your communities.

    The first day will also feature inspiring and educational talks from well-respected experts such as former Office of Civil Defense administrator and disaster management head Alexander Pama and Pasig City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) head Ritche Van Angeles.

    Day 2: Gearing up for Disaster Preparedness

    The second day of the program covers a broad range of topics and features a variety of interesting thought leaders and experts.

    The day begins with a discussion on how we can help vulnerable communities adapt to climate change and its effects. Invited speakers include Commission on Climate Change commissioner Vernice Victorio and National Youth Commission Chair Aiza Seguerra.

    After every disaster, ensuring that life goes on and businesses return to normal is critical for post-disaster recovery. The second session of Day 2 will discuss how business continuity is part of community resilience and will include speakers from the Philippine Disaster Resiliency Foundation (PDRF), Smart Communications, and the Business Continuity Management Association of the Philippines.

    Disaster preparedness is not just the government’s responsibility. We all have a part to play. Session 3 of Day 2 will tackle the role of civic action in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Keynoting the session is Senator Richard Gordon who also chairs the Philippine Red Cross. Other speakers include Oxfam in the Philippines head Daniel Sinnathamby and Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines-National Secretariat for Social Action (CBCP-NASSA) head Father Edwin Gariguez.

    Session 4 will focus on how we can better localize disaster preparedness so that every community and local government takes full ownership of the planning, management, and recovery from a disaster. Undersecretary Ricardo Jalad, the current executive director of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) and OCD administrator, headlines the session alongside Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) undersecretary Austere Panadero.

    The final session of the day tackles the challenges that lie ahead and how education is the key to meeting these challenges. The invited keynote speaker for the session is Department of Education (DepEd) secretary Leonor Briones. Other invited speakers include UP Resiliency Institute head Mahar Lagmay and Assistant Director Tetsuya Koide from the Japan Foundation.

    Wrapping up the day’s talks will be Department of Science and Technology (DOST) undersecretary for disaster preparedness Dr Renato Solidum.

    XChange Fair

    Outside the Samsung Hall, Agos partners will have booths displaying the latest gear for your Go Bags and other informative exhibits. There will also be a demonstration on how to create a solar lamp by the Liter of Light Foundation. The XChange Fair is open to the public.

    MovePH is still accepting applications for booths. Inquire at move.ph+agos@rappler.com.

    The Summit is organized by MovePH, Rappler's civic engagement arm, and is co-presented by SM Supermalls, the official venue partner. The Summit is also made possible with the support of Ateneo de Manila University's eBayanihan program, the MMDA, and the Japan Foundation. 

    Participants must register for each day they want to attend. Seats at the Summit are limited so get your free tickets today!

    Full Program

    Day 1 - July 7, 2017

     

    11:00 am - 1:00 pm

    Registration

    Opening of XChange Fair

     

    1:00 - 1:15 pm

    Welcome Remarks

    Maria Ressa

    CEO, Rappler

    MMShakeDrill: Preparing for the Big One

    1:15 - 1:30 pm

    Keynote Speech

     

    1:30 - 1:45 pm

    How LGUs are preparing for the Big One

     

    1:45 - 2:15 pm

    #EarthquakePH: The Metro Manila Shake Drill 2017

    Ramon Santiago

    OIC, Flood Control Info Center, MMDA

    2:15 - 2:30 pm

    Collaboration for Disaster Preparedness

    RAdm. Alexander Pama (ret.)

    Former OCD Executive Director

    2:30 - 3:00 pm

    Panel Q&A: #EarthquakePH

    BGen. Danilo Lim (ret)

    RAdm. Alexander Pama (ret)

    Mayor Herbert Bautista (TBC)

    Ramon Santiago

    Moderated by:

    Voltaire Tupaz

    MovePH Editor

    3:00 - 3:15 pm

    Coffee Break

     

    3:15 - 3:30 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations

    PH72 - an Emegency Preparedness Tool

    Migel Estoque

    Communications Manager, PDRF

    3:30 - 4:30 pm

    Training Workshop for Agos Volunteers

       Topics:

    • Social Media Training

    • Agos eBayanihan Platform

    • Volunteer Mobilization

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH

     

    Dr. Reena Estuar, PhD

    Ateneo de Manila University

    4:30 - 4:45 pm

    Inspirational Talk

    Ritche Van Angeles

    Pasig City DRRM Chief

    4:45 - 5:00 pm

    Awarding of Certificates

    Closing

     

    5:00 - 6:00 pm

    Agos Fellowship at XChange Fair

     

     

    Day 2 - July 8, 2017

    7:00 - 9:00 am

    Registration

    Opening of XChange Fair

     

    Preparing Vulnerable Communities for Climate Change and Disaster Resiliency

    9:00 - 9:10 am

    Welcome Remarks

    Maria Ressa

    CEO, Rappler

    9:10 - 9:30 am

    Keynote Speech

     

    9:30 - 9:40 am

    Video recap of Day 1

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH

    9:40 - 10:00 am

    Climate Change as the New Normal

     

    9:50 - 10:10 am

    Policy Reforms for Climate Change

     

    10:10 - 10:30 am

    Panel Q&A: Climate Change Adaptation

     

    UNICEF

    Moderated by:

    Voltaire Tupaz

    MovePH Editor

    Business Continuity

    10:30 - 10:45

    Community Resiliency through Business Continuity

    Rhiza Nery

    Business Continuity Program Manager, PDRF

    10:45 - 11:00

    Bridging the Community

    Darwin Flores

    VP for Community Partnerships, Smart

    11:00 - 11:10

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Liter of Light

    Ilac Diaz

    Liter of Light Founder

    11:10 - 11:20

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Staying Alive PH

    Martin Aguda

    Social Media for Social Good

    11:20  - 12:00 nn

    Relaunch of Agos eBayanihan Platform

    Maria Ressa

    CEO, Rappler

     

    Dr. Reena Estuar, PhD

    Ateneo de Manila University

    12:00 - 1:00 pm

    Lunch Break

    XChange Fair

     

    Civic Action for DRRM

    1:00 - 1:30 pm

    Gearing up the Philippine Red Cross

    Sen. Richard Gordon

    Chairman, Philippine Red Cross

    1:30 - 2:00 pm

    Challenges of Disaster Financing  

    Daniel Sinnathamby

    Country Director, Oxfam

    2:00 - 2:10 pm

    Social Action Communities

    Fr. Edwin Gariguez

    CBCP-NASSA

    2:10 - 2:20 pm

    Women as Disaster Managers

     

     

    2:20 - 2:30 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    K9 SAR Team

    Mon Santiago

    MMDA

    Localizing Disaster Preparedness

    2:30 - 2:50 pm

    National Government

    Usec. Ricardo Jalad

    Office of Civil Defense

    2:50 - 3:00 pm

    Project Listo

    Usec. Austere Panadero

    DILG

    3:00 - 3:10 pm

    Local Government Preparedness

     

    3:10 - 3:30 pm

    Panel Q&A: Localizing Disaster Preparedness

    Usec. Ricardo Jalad

    Usec. Austere Panadero

    Rep from Save the Children (TBC)

    Moderated by:

    Gemma Mendoza

    Content and Research Strategy Head, Rappler

    #SafeSchoolsPH: Mainstreaming DRR-CCA in Schools

    3:30 - 3:50 pm

    Education is the key to Zero Casualty

     

    3:50 - 4:00 pm

    DepEd Agos Partnership

     

    4:00 - 4:10 pm

    From Project NOAH to UP Resilience Institute

    Prof. Mahar Lagmay

    Head, UP-NOAH

    4:10 - 4:20 pm

    Project HANDS

     

    Asst Dir. Tetsuya Koide

    Japan Foundation

    4:20 - 4:40 pm

    Keynote Speech

    Disaster Imagination

    Usec. Renato Solidum

    DOST

    4:40 pm

    Closing

    Photo Taking

    XChange Fair

     

     – Rappler.com

     


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    ADVOCACY WALK. Students from different public schools join the Advocacy Walk on June 22, 2017 at the SM Sky Dome in celebration of National Safe Kids Week. Photo by Kaela Malig/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Many Filipino children, clad in their school uniforms and polished black shoes, walk or commute daily to go to school – even as speeding vehicles travel alongside them.

    From 2006 to 2014 alone, an average of 671 Filipino children died each year due to road crashes, according to the Philippine Statistics Authority.

    The World Health Organization also said road crash injuries are among the top causes of death for children. (READ: IN NUMBERS: Road crash incidents in the Philippines)

    Hoping to address this issue, Safe Kids Worldwide Philippines (SKWP), a global non-governmental organization dedicated to the prevention of unintentional injuries to children, celebrated the 10th anniversary of National Safe Kids Week last June 22 with the theme “#SaveKidsLives: School-Home-Road."

    The group aims to help save lives by raising awareness of road safety in schools and in homes. (READ: How do you keep kids safe on the road?)

    Safer roads for children

    SAVE KIDS' LIVES. Safe Kids Worldwide Philippines president Dr Jocelyn Yambao-Franco delivers her speech at the SM Sky Dome on June 22, 2017. Photo by Kaela Malig/Rappler

    National Safe Kids Week is a special event that occurs every 3rd week of June by virtue of Presidential Proclamation No. 1307. It was created to address the prevention of child traumatic injuries, including ones that result from road crashes.

    The 10th anniversary of National Safe Kids Week was celebrated last June 18 to 24, and SKWP, recognized as a stakeholder, invited its partner schools and organizations to gather at the SM Sky Dome in Quezon City to mark the occasion.

    For this year's National Safe Kids Week, SKWP president Dr Jocelyn Yambao-Franco said they chose to focus on 3 main goals: education, enforcement, and engineering.

    Yambao-Franco said that through education, students are more aware of pedestrian rules; through proper enforcement of road rules by authorities, fewer road crashes will occur; and through good design and engineering of roads, injuries can be avoided.

    "Usually we start with schools, so the children will know how to walk to and from the schools... So they know to walk on the pedestrian lanes, and walk properly on the sidewalks," Yambao-Franco said.

    SKWP partnered with government agencies as well, including the Department of Public Works and Highways, to help create directional sides and paint pedestrian lanes.

    National Safe Kids Week also served as a follow-up event to the 4th United Nations Global Road Safety Week that encouraged vehicles to slow down and save lives.

    Representatives of government agencies and partner organizations attended the event, as well as elementary public school students and teachers from Quezon City, Parañaque, Pasay, and Pampanga. – Rappler.com

    Kaela Malig is a Rappler intern.


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    Bookmark this page to watch the interview live on Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – Every year in June, members of the LGTBQ+ (lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual, queer, et al) community and their supporters celebrate Pride Month. Here in the country, gay rights advocates are calling for solidarity among Filipinos as they fight to end gender inequality and discrimination.

    A survey by Metro Manila Pride revealed that the Philippines' LGBTQ+ community has 3 main issues: lack of acceptance and violence in the home, discrimination in the workplace, and bullying in schools. (READ: Is the Philippines really gay-friendly?)

    At 4 pm on Tuesday, June 27, Rappler talks to Naomi Fontanos, executive director of Gender and Development Advocates (GANDA) Filipinas, a non-governmental organization that works to protect and promote human rights based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression (SOGIE). 

    Watch the interview live here. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines –  BS Molecular Biology and Biotechnology summa cum laude graduate Arman Ali Ghodsinia delivered the valedictory speech in the 106th commencement exercises of the University of the Philippines Diliman on Sunday, June 25. (READ: Maranao UP graduate: 'Magmalasakit sa mga naaapi')

    Ghodsinia, who hails from Marawi City, spoke not only on behalf of 36 summa cum laude students and 4,000 graduates but also for his fellow Maranao who are affected by the war in Mindanao.  

    To date, more than 83,500 families or 385,000 people from Marawi City have been displaced by the month-long clashes between government troops and local terrorists. The Marawi crisis had prompted President Rodrigo Duterte to declare martial law in the southern Philippines.

    On Rappler Talk on Thursday, 3:30 pm, June 29, Ghodsinia speaks to MovePH's Voltaire Tupaz about the people of Marawi – their plight and aspirations – from the point of view of a young Maranao. Joining him is his sister Farah, a peace advocate who graduated magna cum laude at UP.

    Know how the new graduate broke barriers as an Iskolar ng Bayan and why he, together with his sister, intend to push for peace in Mindanao moving forward. – Rappler.com


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    EARTHQUAKE DRILL. Cops 'rescue' a mock victim at the Manila Police District headquarters during the National Simultaneous Earthquake Drill on June 29, 2017. Photo by Inoue Jaena/Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – The Office of Civil Defense (OCD) led the National Simultaneous Earthquake Drill on Thursday afternoon, June 29.

    This is the 2nd quarter edition of the drill, which is regularly organized by the OCD to ensure that authorities and the public will be prepared for earthquakes. (READ: Earthquake tips: what to do before, during, and after)

    Below are some photos of the activity in various parts of the metro.

    Makati

    TRAFFIC ENFORCERS. MMDA traffic enforcers participate in the earthquake drill in Makati City on June 29, 2017. Photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

    STAFF. MMDA employees cover their heads as they go out of the office. Photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

    RESCUE. Responders 'rescue' a mock victim in one of the simulations during the earthquake drill. Photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

    Manila

    SAFE ZONE. Uniformed and non-uniformed personnel evacuate at the Manila Police District headquarters on June 29, 2017. Photo by Inoue Jaena/Rappler

    DUCK. Policemen at the Manila Police District headquarters take cover during the earthquake drill on June 29, 2017. Photo by Inoue Jaena/Rappler

    EMERGENCY AID. Rescue operations are simulated during the earthquake drill on June 29, 2017. Photo by Inoue Jaena/Rappler

    Quezon City

    PRACTICE. Students of Corazon C. Aquino Elementary School in Batasan, Quezon City, cover their heads. Photo by Darren Langit/Rappler

    COVER. Students cover their heads with notebooks during the earthquake drill. Photo by Darren Langit/Rappler

    Did you participate in the Nationwide Simultaneous Earthquake Drill? Let us know in the comments below! – Rappler.com


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    On Rappler Talk on Thursday, 3:30 pm, June 29, UP honors students Arman Ali Ghodsinia and his sister, Farah, talk about the plight and aspirations of their fellow Maranaos as the fight rages in their hometown

    MANILA, Philippines – Fresh from his much-applauded valedictory speech at the graduation ceremony of the University of the Philippines in Diliman, Arman Ali Ghodsinia shared what he intends to do after college and his big dreams for the country.

    Ghodsinia, a Maranao from Marawi who just graduated summa cum laude in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology at the UP College of Science, said he wants to help build the biotechnology industry in the Philippines.

    "I believe (that) in the future, there will be a biotechnology industry here in the Philippines. And I have a lot of brilliant batchmates who I see will contribute well to the science in the Philippines. And together, we will be able to raise the science in the Philippines to the extent that people from other countries will come here to study science,” Ghodsinia said on Rappler Talk on Thursday, June 29.

    Such industry does not exist yet in the country, though there are brilliant scientists and students studying the field, Ghodsinia said, citing a UP professor teaching biotechnology enterprises. 

    Biotechnology, according to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, is “any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use."

    In the Philippines, the field of biotechnology should benefit the agriculture sector, Ghodsinia said, noting that the country hosts world-renowned research centers like the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the Philippine Carabao Center (PCC).

    “If we are to focus on something, I’d say that could be one of our priorities – improving our agriculture, because it’s one of our strong points,” the young scientist said.

    Giving back to Marawi

    The fresh graduate, who got a general weighted average of 1.173, worked on a thesis that tackled “genetic aberrations” that cause cancer and how these affect health outcomes like a patient’s reaction to medicines. 

    Ghodsinia plans to pursue graduate studies abroad but vowed to return to the country and open his own laboratory.

    “And (through) this laboratory, I want to open opportunities for my kababayans (townmates) from Mindanao, from Marawi, and people who come from poor backgrounds to learn stuff in molecular biology as well. In doing so, together, we are able to raise (the level) of science in the Philippines,” he said.

    He encouraged other Filipino scientists to do the same and help further develop science and technology in the country.

    “You have to have many scientists – Filipino scientists – who are passionate about the country, and those who do not forget their country and are willing to sacrifice amidst all the opportunities abroad,” Ghodsinia said in a mix of Filipino and English. 

    Ghodsinia called on the government to provide more funds for science education in the country. “This means that you have to have more students who are interested in science,” he said.

    'Children of Mindanao'

    In the meantime, Ghodsinia is supporting his sister Farah's initiative, "Children of Mindanao,” which helps Muslim children access good education.

    "We want to raise the awareness that there are certain groups in the Philippines, not only the Maranaos, who are being left behind. We, as scholars of the nation, or anyone in the Philippines, should also look [after] them,” he said.

    Ghodsinia's viral valedictory speech called for peace and compassion as fighting rages in his hometown. (READ: Maranao UP graduate: 'Magmalasakit sa mga naaapi')

    "Here I am standing in front of you today, as proof that members of minorities like us Maranaos can also do well; and contribute effectively to societal growth if given the same opportunities and rights like many other Filipinos," he said in his speech.

    Ghodsinia's sister, who also graduated with honors in UP Diliman before taking up law in the same university, is pushing for inclusive education and development in the country.

    "It’s difficult to have that if the war consistently persists. You see these individuals actually crying and suffering – they don’t deserve it," Farah said on Rappler Talk. 

    According to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), more than 83,500 families or 385,000 people from Marawi City have so far been displaced by the month-long clashes between government troops and local terrorists. – Rappler.com

     

     


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    MANILA, Philippines – We asked people at the 2017 Pride March what they thought about love.

    Watch, and listen to their answers. – Rappler.com

    Video by Alecs Ongcal


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    GUN POINT. Traffic personnel has been using a newly-procured speed gun by the Iloilo City Government to monitor speeding vehicles at the Diversion Road since June 1, 2017. Photo by Ted Aldwin Ong/Rappler

    ILOILO, Philippines – The usual drive from Pavia town to Iloilo City takes around 30 to 45 minutes. But on June 1, it took longer than usual for motorists.

    On June 1, the city government of Iloilo enforced Ordinance No. 2015-283 or the Speed Limit Ordinance. (READ: What laws help keep road users safe in the Philippines?)

    "I was pulled over by a member of the traffic management personnel along Barangay Sambag, Jaro, for my speed registered at 61 to 62 km/hr. In my speedometer, I was speeding at the usual 60 km/hr," said April Sobrevega.

    "I was confident, driving on my usual 60 km/hr along the highway, being in the fast lane," she added.

    Sobrevega is among the thousands of motorists who pass through the 5.84-kilometer Senator Benigno Aquino Sr Avenue, commonly known as Diversion Road, from their homes to various destinations.

    However, she lamented that she did not know about the implementation of the ordinance. She did not hear about it from the news or from other sources.

    From June 1 to 15, there were 495 first-time offenders apprehended under the speed limit ordinance. (READ: IN NUMBERS: Road crash incidents in the Philippines)

    Data from Philippine Statistics Authority in 2014 showed that 733 people died from motor vehicle crash incidents in Region VI.

    If population is taken into account, Western Visayas is the most affected region in the island of Visayas in terms of road crash deaths.

    Late implementation

    The ordinance was passed June 2, 2015, but was only implemented two years later.

    On the first day of enforcement, 40 motorists were apprehended for going over the speed limit. (READ: What's lacking in our road safety laws?)

    City Administrator Hernando Galvez explained that the delay in implementation was caused by lack of equipment and trained personnel.

    "The City Government’s inability to enforce the legislation was due to lack of proper equipment like speed guns, deficient support materials like speed limit signages, and lack of trained field personnel," Galvez said.

    Category

    Name of Highway, Thoroughfare,

    Street, or Road

    Maximum allowable

    speed (km/hr)

    Automobiles & motorcycles

    Trucks and buses

    1. Major roads and highways

    Gen. Luna St to Diversion Rd up to Brgy Ungka Jaro

    60

    50

    Circumferential, Radial and Coastal Roads

    60

    40

    2. City roads

    Brgy Sambag, Jaro, to Fort San Pedro and from Iloilo Provincial Capitol up to Brgy Mohon in Arevalo.

    40

    30

    3. Other roads

    Highways, streets, or roads whether national or local

    30

    20

    The speed limit ordinance was passed "to regulate speed limit due to the numerous road incidents that have resulted to physical injuries, damage to property, and even death."

    The ordinance set a maximum of 60 km/hr on major roads and highways while the minimum is 20 km/h for other roads.

    Violators face the following penalties and jail time:

    • First offense: P200 and/or imprisonement of 1 day minimum to 2 months
    • Second offense: P500 and/or imprisonment of 2 months and 1 day minimum to 4 months
    • Third offense: to pay P1,000 and/or imprisonment of 4 months and 1 day minimum to 6 months maximum, at the discretion of the court

    Sobrevega, a road crash survivor herself, said more information should have been disseminated before the ordinance was enforced.

    Many road users also complained about the lack of early warning signs, substandard sizes or poor visibility of speed limit signages, and the absence of traffic enforcers at night among others.

    "Ensuring that roads are safe requires a mix of intervention from the local government like proper determination of fast lane and slow lane, appropriate information dissemination drive among the public, and supporting enforcement with proper facility like signages that will help remind vehicle owners to observe the speed limit," Sobrevega said.

    Is speeding the culprit?

    Data collected by the city government showed that there are a total of 3,983 "traffic-related accidents" from January 2016 to May 2017.

    But the reports, however, could not help point out which incident resulted from speeding.

    "Physical Injury are cases involving vehicles and persons while damage to property involve vehicles and another vehicle or properties," explained Susan Bedonia from the Records Section of the Iloilo City Police Office-Traffic Investigation and Enforcement Unit (ICPO-TIEU).

    Traffic violation records of the city do not identify whether speeding is the cause of a road mishap as well. (READ: Road crash numbers: Looking at the data sources)

    From January 2015 to April 2017, the Transport Management and Traffic Regulation Office (TMTRO) of the city recorded a total of 97,248 traffic violations.

    But the current city government is addressing the issue now through the adoption of an intelligent traffic system (ITS), said Galvez. 

    The ITS will include related legislation on traffic, procurement of equipment on projects, as well as other interventions.

    "We are mindful of public safety yet we have recognized the complexity of interventions that are needed and we are taking one step a time to address it," said Galvez, who is also a lawyer.

    On June 20, the Iloilo City Council issued an order to temporarily suspend the implementation of the speed limit ordinance.

    This was done to give way to amendments and revisions set by the legislation. Considerations for amendments include the following:

    • Review of speed limit set on different category of roads
    • Conformity of size of speed limit signages to international standards
    • Conduct public hearing

    Some of these may address the concerns of pedestrians, commuters, and motorists but it seems road safety in the city has a long way to go. – Rappler.com

    Learn more about Filipinos' safety on the road by visiting the Road Safety Awareness microsite.

     


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    #MMSHAKEDRILL 2017 PARTNERS. MMDA chairman Danilo Lim and MovePH executive director Rupert Ambil signed an agreement on Friday, June 30 to use the Agos system for the Metro Manila Shakedrill that will be conducted from July 14 to 17

    MANILA, Philippines – To raise public awareness on preparing for a major earthquake or the "Big One" that could strike anytime, the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) has partnered with Agos, powered by eBayanihan. 

    MMDA chairman Danilo Lim and MovePH executive director Rupert Ambil signed an agreement on Friday, June 30, to use the Agos system for the Metro Manila Shakedrill that will be conducted from July 14 to 17. 

    Agos is a collaborative platform that combines top-down government action with bottom-up civic engagement to help communities learn about disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, as well as geohazards in their area.

    Operated by MovePH, Rappler’s civic engagement arm, Agos harnesses social media and technology to ensure that critical information flows to those who need it, before, during, and after disasters. 

    Rappler will again be the social media and information campaign partner of MMDA for this year's metro-wide exercise.

    MMDA, MovePH, and Rappler have been working together since the first #MMShakeDrill in 2015. Rappler helped drive public awareness on the event, amplifying #MMShakeDrill, which reached over 2 billion views on Twitter and trended in the Philippines and abroad.

    Online participation increased the following year – the second #MMShakeDrill – using same hashtag which racked up over 3.5 billion impressions.

    "We have made history in 2015 by conducting the first ever metro-wide earthquake drill through the Metro Manila Shake Drill. This year, on July 14 to 17, join us once again as we conduct the 3rd Metro Manila Shake Drill….Together, we can make zero casualty a reality," Lim said in a video message. 

    The 2017 drill is being organized by MMDA, the Metro Manila Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (MMDRRMC), and other agencies and stakeholders. It seeks to foster a culture of preparedness among Metro Manila residents in the event of a 7.2-magnitude earthquake caused by the movement of the West Valley Fault. (READ: What dangers await when the West Valley Fault moves?)

    Metro Manila's daytime population is roughly 14 million. Its nighttime population is about 11 million.

    Based on the Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS), which analyzed different earthquake scenarios in Metro Manila, if a magnitude 7.2 earthquake from the West Valley Fault hits the mega city in the evening, it could leave 33,500 people dead.

    The West Valley Fault, which traverses various parts of Metro Manila and surrounding provinces, is anticipated to critically affect the entire country.

    The highly populated region hosts the seat of government and the country’s business capital. – Rappler.com

    Do you want to take an active part in the 2017 #MMShakeDrill? Email move.ph@rappler.com or visit the #MMShakeDrill microsite for more details.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


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    MEDICAL CENTER. After more than two decades of neglect, Justiniano R. Borja General Hospital once again earns the trust and confidence of the Kagay-anons. Photo by Alex Belen.

    CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY, Philippines – Controversies have marred the Justiniano R. Borja General Hospital (JRBGH) for almost two decades – from the lack of facilities and financial resources to poor management – leaving it to operate in a dismal state.

    It has been a long-standing struggle for the hospital administration to improve their services to better serve the public. But now, things are looking up for the local hospital.

    “In 2013, when the Moreno administration took over, the team from his Misamis Oriental administration crafted the strategic plan for the hospital, together with key stakeholders, and came out with the vision for JRBGH becoming ‘the nation's premier local government hospital by 2016 with preferential option for the poor and underprivileged’,” JRBGH hospital executive officer Dr. Ramon Nery said. 

    Fast forward to 2017, JRBGH's key stakeholders reshaped the hospital's earlier vision, for 2019. This was made possible with the technical assistance of Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan’s Governance Leadership Institute (GLI),

    This revised vision for the city hospital is starting to gain traction as Nery hopes that it will become “a medical center of choice,” equipped to address complicated or tertiary-level medical cases.

    The hospital’s status elevation would benefit all people in the socio-economic spectrum, particularly the poor and the marginalized.

    To illustrate the vision: If a Kagay-anon has a serious or complicated condition, the patient doesn’t need to go to Cebu or Manila or abroad to get the treatment. It will be available at CDO’s Justiniano R. Borja Medical Center. (READ: CDO revives lone city govt-owned hospital)

    Partnerships toward quality healthcare

    The vision for the hospital may be ambitious, but Nery is optimistic that this is achievable through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) and the support of the Department of Health and the local health board.

    This project aims to help decongest the DOH-owned Northern Mindanao Medical Center, which is also located in the city’s busy downtown.

    “NMMC being a public medical center could not focus on addressing tertiary-level cases due to the influx of patients with primary and secondary cases, in the midst of the shortage of medical professionals and lack of facilities,” Nery said.

    As in other parts of the country, it’s been a culture in public medical centers to try to accommodate as many patients as possible, regardless of case levels, who can’t afford the otherwise expensive treatments in private hospitals and healthcare providers.

    Nery’s dream is for the city medical center to become the “primary choice for Kagay-anons” so NMMC can address more patients coming outside CDO or other parts of Region 10.

    For Nery, the city’s 19 urban health centers also need to be improved, modernized, and accredited by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) as maternal and childcare facilities or birthing homes.

    The upgrading of urban health centers will help both JRBGH and NMMC to concentrate more on catering secondary, tertiary, and other complicated cases in this part of the country.

    Significant changes

    This visioncomes with concrete details of accomplishments and hard figures as its foundation.

    “What transpired in the last 3 to 4 challenging years has been considered as ‘phenomenal’ for the JRBGH personnel. These changes have brought back the confidence that they can do more,” Nery shared.

    Recently, they have opened the third floor of the Pimentel building, which has not been occupied for the past 18 years. An 8-bed capacity intensive care unit (ICU) is also being constructed while plans to build a mental health facility are underway.

    Because of their additional facilities and services, the city hospital has regained the trust and support of the CDO community, particularly from the poor and the underprivileged.  

    Based on the hospital records, one baby is being delivered every hour daily; 8 major operations were performed (including two cesarean sections); and 250-300 consultations at the Out-Patient Department (OPD) a day.

    Most wards and rooms for frontline services are airconditioned and public wifi service is provided at the OPD.

    The city hospital recently hired additional 11 doctors from Xavier Ateneo’s Jose P. Rizal School of Medicine, 40 additional nurses, and 60 administrative support staff.

    As Nery’s team continues to improve the operations and services of JRBGH, the city hospital is also able to generate revenue.

    In the bigger picture, the city government could self-regenerate using the revenues from healthcare services, in turn, revenues raised from PhilHealth payments would be reverted right to the hospital through medicines, equipment, and more services for the people.

    The management of the JRBGH has shown that with determination coupled with the passion for genuine public service, they can cater to the medical needs of the public and at the same time, contribute to the city’s growth.

    In 2016, the hospital posted a total revenue of P180M and served a total of 134,418 patients from the Inpatient, Outpatient and Emergency Room departments from 39,898 in 2013.

    Nery compares that what used to be the annual income of the hospital in 2013 was the hospital's September 2016 income, worth P19M. The highest monthly income recorded last year was P23 million, in March.

    In 2014, the hospital's revenues reached P65M and P120M in 2015.

    Nery recounted that when they took over in July 2013, the hospital's annual income only amounted to P19M.

    Revenues for this current year are projected to reach over P200M.  

    The hospital’s financing is primarily provided for by PhilHealth, Health Facilities Enhancement Program (HFEP) of the DOH, and external medical assistance programs.

    “All services of the JRBGH are free of charge, from simple to complicated operations. The city hospital has effectively utilized the benefits of the government-owned insurance corporation PhilHealth, our bread and butter,” Nery said.

    The free hospital services include orthopedic implants, cataract operations, anti-rabies vaccines, blood and blood products, inpatient, outpatient and take-home meds, radiology, and laboratory.

    Most of the city hospital’s patients are PhilHealth members. JRBGH also facilitate the membership of those patients who are not yet covered by the program.  

    PATIENT. Hose Felesedario Palasan is one of the city hospital’s patients whose fees were shouldered by JRBGH's program. Photo by Stephen Pedroza

    Sixty-year-old Hose Felesedario Palasan is one of the city hospital’s patients whose fees were shouldered by the government health program. He was involved in a motor crash two weeks prior his check-in at the hospital on June 19 for his dislocated hip bone.

    He was unable to go to the city hospital immediately after the motor crash because he had no means of transportation. His leg had also swollen to the point that he couldn’t easily move it anymore.

    He was only able to go to the city hospital when his sibling visited him at his home. By June 24, he had already gotten blood tests and X-ray scans of his chest and lower body. He is currently waiting for his scheduled surgery for a stainless-steel hip replacement — the purchase of which is still pending.

    All of these are free of charge.

    Palasan shared that he went to the city hospital because it was the only hospital that could help him without a fee. 

    “It was the only hospital that could help me, especially when I need the stainless [steel implant]. I can’t pay, so I went here,” he said in Binisaya.

    Elelyn Ellyera, 28, is also another patient of the city hospital. She had undergone cesarian section for her first baby delivery on June 18, as per her doctor’s recommendation.

    She explained that she went to the city hospital for her delivery after her local health center in Kauswagan suggested to go to JRBGH. What normally costs thousands in a private hospital was given free of charge to her by JRBGH. 

    By June 24, Ellyera was discharged from the hospital with her healthy baby.

    Regaining the confidence of the community to the JRBGH is what Nery considers as “pamana” or legacy as he intends to retire from the helms of the hospital a few years from now.   

    Status elevation

    For Nery, they are slowly changing the image of the city hospital, from its depressing condition to a self-sustaining entity. However, there is still a lot of work to do.

    He also wants their best practices to be replicated by other local government units in the Philippines. To this end, JRBGH could serve as an archetype for other government-run hospitals.

    A pioneering innovation is the Telehealth Project between JRBGH and Southern Philippines Medical Center, wherein a psychiatrist based in Davao conducts weekly consultations with patients in CDO via video conference.

    Nery said that realizing this new vision of becoming a medical center is not a moonshot.

    But the greater challenge lies in governance, that is why he led the formation of a team composed of key personnel of the city hospital to study the conversion and start the integration of JRBGH into the Department of Health system.

    The city hospital has to apply to DOH for status elevation and accreditation, based on the classification criteria and regulations stipulated in Republic Act No. 4226 (Hospital Licensure Act).

    Xavier Ateneo’s Governance and Leadership Institute serves as the intermediary in this project and facilitator for the series of workshops using the framework and principles of Kaplan and Norton’s “Balanced Scorecard.”

    The JR Borja General Hospital is expected to undergo more major changes in the years to come while surpassing their recent achievements and expanding the scope of their services and operations. Rappler.com 

    Stephen Pedroza, Rappler's Lead Mover in Cagayan de Oro City, is a journalism graduate from Xavier University - Ateneo de Cagayan. He attended a course on new media in journalism at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana.


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    MANILA, Philippines – The observance of the National Disaster Resilience Month in July is a reminder to everyone of the need to reduce risks and be prepared for disasters. What better way to learn about disaster preparedness than from the experts and practitioners themselves?

    On July 7-8, disaster management experts, responders, policy makers, and volunteers will gather for the first ever Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness at the Samsung Hall of the SM Aura mall in Taguig.

    The two-day summit aims to bring together key stakeholders, tackle pressing issues, and learn from good practices that mitigated risks or achieved zero casualties in a disaster scenario. It is organized by MovePH, Rappler's civic engagement arm. 

    Day 1: Climate action and #MMShakeDrill

    Day 1 of the summit begins at 10 am, highlighting climate action initiated by vulnerable sectors like the youth and women.

    Speakers for this session include National Youth Commission Commissioner Paul Pangilinan, YesPinoy Foundation founder Dingdong Dantes, and Climate Change Commission senior communications director

    The afternoon session will focus on the upcoming Metro Manila Shake Drill (#MMShakeDrill), a metro-wide earthquake drill which will be held from July 14 to 17, 2017 to test the metro’s response to a possible 7.2-magnitude earthquake.

    Chairman Danny Lim of the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) will discuss plans for the #MMShakeDrill and what companies, schools, and the general public should do before, during and after the drill.

    Representatives of Metro Manila-based establishments, village associations, and civic groups are highly encouraged to attend Day 1 of the Summit to learn about best practices for conducting earthquake drills in your communities.

    The first day will also feature inspiring and educational talks from well-respected experts such as former Office of Civil Defense administrator and disaster management head Alexander Pama and Pasig City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) head Ritche Van Angeles.

    XChange Fair

    Outside the Samsung Hall, Agos partners will have booths displaying the latest gear for your Go Bags and other informative exhibits. There will also be a demonstration on how to create a solar lamp by the Liter of Light Foundation. The XChange Fair is open to the public. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – The observance of the National Disaster Resilience Month in July is a reminder to everyone of the need to reduce risks and be prepared for disasters. What better way to learn about disaster preparedness than from the experts and practitioners themselves?

    On July 7-8, disaster management experts, responders, policy makers, and volunteers will gather for the first ever Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness at the Samsung Hall of the SM Aura mall in Taguig.

    The two-day summit aims to bring together key stakeholders, tackle pressing issues, and learn from good practices that mitigated risks or achieved zero casualty. It is organized by MovePH, Rappler's civic engagement arm. 

    Day 2: Gearing up for disaster preparedness 

    The second day of the program covers a broad range of topics and features a variety of thought leaders and experts.

    The day begins with a discussion on how we can help vulnerable communities adapt to climate change and its effects. Invited speakers include disaster preparedness and climate action champions Senator Loren Legarda, Albay 2nd District Representative Joey Salceda, and Secretary Vernice Victorio of the CCC.

    After every disaster, ensuring that life goes on and businesses return to normal is critical for post-disaster recovery. The second session of Day 2 will discuss how business continuity is part of community resilience and will include speakers from the Philippine Disaster Resiliency Foundation (PDRF) and Smart Communications.

    Disaster preparedness is not just the government’s responsibility. We all have a part to play. Session 3 of Day 2 will tackle the role of civic action in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Keynoting the session is Senator Richard Gordon who also chairs the Philippine Red Cross. Other speakers include Oxfam in the Philippines head Daniel Sinnathamby and Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines-National Secretariat for Social Action (CBCP-NASSA) head Father Edwin Gariguez.

    Session 4 will focus on how we can better localize disaster preparedness so that every community and local government can take full ownership of the planning, management, and recovery from a disaster. Undersecretary Ricardo Jalad, the current executive director of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) and OCD administrator, headlines the session alongside Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) undersecretary Austere Panadero.

    The final session of the day tackles the challenges that lie ahead and how education is the key to meeting these challenges. The Department of Education's (DepEd) Director Ronilda Co will talk about how disaster preparedness can be mainstreamed in the classroom. Other speakers include UP Resiliency Institute head Mahar Lagmay and Assistant Director Tetsuya Koide from the Japan Foundation.

    Wrapping up the day’s talks will be Department of Science and Technology (DOST) undersecretary for disaster preparedness Dr Renato Solidum.

    XChange Fair

    Outside the Samsung Hall, Agos partners will have booths displaying the latest gear for your Go Bags and other informative exhibits. There will also be a demonstration on how to create a solar lamp by the Liter of Light Foundation. The XChange Fair is open to the public. – Rappler.com


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    MANILA, Philippines – This July, the Philippines is observing the National Disaster Resilience Month.

    Learn from leading champions, experts, and practioners of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation at the Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness this Friday, July 7, and Saturday, July 8.

    Here are the profiles of several key speakers at the Agos Summit, which was organized by Rappler's civic engagement arm MovePH: (Check the full program at the bottom)

    Senator Loren Legarda

    Senator Loren Legarda is a topnotch senator who has authored several landmark laws for the environment and disaster risk reduction: Clean Air Act; Ecological Solid Waste Management Act; Environmental Awareness Education Act; Renewable Energy Act; Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act; Climate Change Act; and the People’s Survival Fund.

    Her inspiring advocacy on environmental protection and climate resilience has earned her global recognition. In 2015, she was named Global Champion for Resilience by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) and was bestowed by the French government with the title of Knight in the National Order of the French Legion of Honor for her environmental and cultural advocacies.

    As a top-calibre journalist before she was elected Senator, Legarda earned prestigious awards such as the Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM) from the Philippine Jaycees (1992) and The Outstanding Women in the Nation’s Service (TOWNS) Award (1995).

    Senator Richard Gordon

    Senator Richard Gordon is the chairman of the Philippine Red Cross (PRC). Known as an "action man," he is credited for strengthening the organization and building up its capability into the foremost humanitarian organization in the country. He steered the modernization of PRC's rescue capability through the acquisition of emergency response equipment and vehicles including M/V Amazing Grace, the biggest humanitarian and disaster response vessel in the country.

    Under his watch, 27 more blood service facilities were established, making all 96 local PRC chapters capable of blood banking services. He also prioritized the aquisition of new equipment for PRC's round-the-clock Operation Center to ensure efficiency of disaster monitoring. 

    Senator Gordon has won numerous awards including the Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM), University of the Philippines Most Distinguished Alumnus Award, the PRC Gold Humanitarian Award, and the PRC Silver Humanitarian and Doña Aurora Aragon Awards.

    Representative Joey Sarte Salceda 

    Albay 2nd District Representative Joey Salceda is considered as the father of the Albay and Manila Declarations on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA). The declarations paved the way for The Climate Change Act of 2009 and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act which established DRR and CCA as priorities in both local and national government.

    Salceda was often referred to as the Green Economist Governer of Albay when he was serving as the governor of the province. The former governor oversaw the replanting of nearly 318 hectares of mangrove swamps to better protect coastal areas from dangerous storm surges and build tsunami resiliency. 

    In 2010, the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) recognized him as a Senior Global Champion of DRR for his innovative efforts to institutionalize disaster risk management at the local level. 

    Secretary Vernice Victorio

    Prior to her appointment, she was the president of the SEED Institute, a nonprofit sustainability research organization that she cofounded. While at SEED, she led, in partnership with Ateneo de Manila/Manila Observatory, the greenhouse gas emissions assessments of Puerto Princesa, Metro Manila, the entire Philippines, and the Malacañang Palace.Secretary Vernice Victorio is the acting vice-chairperson and executive director of the Climate Change Commission (CCC), with over a decade of experience in environmental advocacies. A Management Engineering (cum laude) graduate from the Ateneo de Manila University, she is the first Filipino to earn a master’s degree in Industrial Ecology (referred to as the "science of sustainability") at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. 

    Undersecretary Ricardo Jalad

    As a former military officer, he has developed an early appreciation for the mandate of the OCD and NDRRMC. His active involvement in rehabilitation and recovery efforts in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Sendong that struck Iligan City in December 2011 is a sterling example of his earlier efforts as a strong DRRM champion.Usec Ricardo Jalad is the administrator of the Office of Civil Defense (OCD) and the executive director of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC). 

    Jalad's distinguished military assignments include his stint as Assistant Division Commander of the Philippine Army’s 5th Infantry Division in Gamu, Isabela from May 2013 to September 2014 and Acting Commander of the same division from February to April 2014. Jalad has a Masters in National Security Administration (MNSA) from the National Defense College of the Philippines.

    Undersecretary Austere Panadero

    Usec Austere Panadero has served the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) for the last two decades, becoming undersecretary in 2007. 

    Through his leadership, local government units are continuously capacitated on disaster preparedness. Under his watch, Oplan Listo (Operation Plan Alert) was developed and implemented, emphasizing the range of actions for early and critical disaster preparedness at the local level.

    Panadero is an Industrial Engineering graduate of the University of the Philippines. He started his career in government with the Development Academy of the Philippines in the early 1980s. In 2016, the Ateneo de Manila University confered on Panadero its Government Service Award for the undersecretary's "unflagging devotion to the difficult work of transforming local governments to become participative, accountable, and effective."

    Undersecretary Hope Hervilla

    Usec Hope Hervilla heads the operations and protective services of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). For over 3 decades, she was involved in various women and children advocacies as an activist leader and social worker.  She also taught at the Central Philippines University in Iloilo City, where she finished her Bachelor of Science in Social Work degree in 1985. She placed second in the 1987 National Social Work Board Examinations.

    Hervilla founded the Save Our Lives, SOS! Panay and Guimaras, a network of civil society groups and individuals that helped address concerns from the oil spill tragedy in Guimaras in 2006 to recovery efforts in the region after Super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan).

    Undersecretary Renato Solidum Jr

    Dr Renato Solidum Jr has been with Phivolcs since 1984, the agency tasked to mitigate the effects of earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. He has recently been appointed as the DOST Undersecretary for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation.

    In 2010, Solidum received the Presidential Lingkod Bayan award for raising the bar of disaster risk reduction and initiating a nationwide mapping program in the Philippines.

    He's a recognized expert in Geochemistry, Marine Geology, Volcano and Earthquake Geology, Geologic Hazards Assessment and Awareness, and Earth Science Education. He holds a Master’s Degree in Geological Science from the University of Illinois and completed his PhD in Earth Science at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University of California in San Diego.

    Commissioner Paul Pangilinan

    Assistant Secretary Paul Pangilinan is the chairman of the National Youth Commission's (NYC) committee on environment. He is a former Sangguniang Kabataan chairman and barangay councilor in Quezon City. 

    Pangilinan obtained his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering degree in 2012 at the University of Santo Tomas. He is currently pursuing Master of Science in Civil Engineering at De La Salle University.

    Dr Alfredo Mahar Lagmay

    Dr Alfredo Mahar Francisco Lagmay is the executive director of the University of the Philippines Resilience Institute. He also heads the UP Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (UP NOAH), a center established to conduct research, development and extension services on natural hazards, disaster risk reduction, and climate change actions.

    Lagmay is a professor at the UP National Institute of Geological Sciences. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from UP and holds a PhD degree in Earth Sciences from the University of Cambridge (2001).

    His work is focused on volcano-tectonics, fluid dynamics of volcanic flows, remote sensing, and Permanent Scatterer Interferometry of faulted regions. Upon receiving his PhD, he returned to the Philippines and has been involved in numerous research efforts related to natural hazards. He lectures on Philippine Disasters by virtue of having hands-on experience in search-and-rescue and forensic analyses of major Philippine catastrophes. 

    Daniel Sinnathamby 

    Daniel Sinnathamby is the interim country director of Oxfam in the Philippines. He has more than 24 years of leadership and management experience with international relief and development agencies in country management and regional leadership in Asia and Africa.

    He has demonstrated thought leadership within humanitarian and development organizations in managing complexity, strategic planning, and effective coordination and management of complex partnerships and networks. He has held regional and country office management positions in Sri Lanka, Lesotho/South Africa, Mozambique, Angola and India and assistant country director and country director positions and regional leadership positions in Asia and southern Africa. 

    Dr Reena Estuar

    Dr Reena Estuar is Director of the Ateneo Java Wireless Competency Center (AJWCC) and an associate professor of the Ateneo de Manila University's (ADMU) School of Science and Engineering. She finished her PhD in Psychology/MS Computer ADMU).

    Under her leadership, the ADMU’s Social Computing Lab built e-Bayanihan, which provides ordinary citizens with a web and mobile based application to report disaster experiences, collaborated with Project Agos, Rappler's disaster and climate change information platform.

    Fr Edwin Gariguez

    Fr Edwin is the Executive Secretary and Country Program Head of Caritas Philippines - the social action arm of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

    He is also an environmentalist and the co-founder of the Alliance Against Mining (ALAMIN). He has a PhD in Applied Cosmic Anthropology from the Asian Social Institute.

    Rina Atienza

    Rina Atienza is a senior communications professional with more than 12 years experience in developing brand campaigns, with a particular strength in community outreach and social advocacy. She has a Masters degree in Social and Cultural History, and is a Certified Neuro-Linguistic Programming practitioner thanks to local Filipino agency Trainstation.

    She now works for the Information and Knowledge Management Division of the Climate Change Commission, having chosen to move back to Manila after 20 years living in London.

    Dingdong Dantes

    Dingdong Dantes is a multi-awarded actor and the founding chairman of YesPinoy Foundation.

    From 2014 to 2016, he served as a commissioner-at-large of the National Youth Commission (NYC), heading the committees on environment and education. He has been instrumental in the delivery of policies and programs that ensured the youth’s meaningful participation in efforts on climate change and disaster risk reduction and management.

    In 2015, he spearheaded the #NowPH or Not On Our Watch Philippines campaign which gathered 3.6 million pledges of support for climate action and for the landmark Paris Agreement.

    Maria Ressa

    Maria A. Ressa has been a journalist in Asia for nearly 30 years and is the author of FROM BIN LADEN TO FACEBOOK: 10 Days of Abduction, 10 Years of Terrorismand Seeds of Terror: An Eyewitness Account of Al-Qaeda's Newest Center of Operations in Southeast Asia.

    Ressa is one of the founders of independent production company, Probe Productions, before reporting for and heading CNN's Southeast Asia operations for nearly 2 decades (bureau chief in Manila then Jakarta). For 6 years, she was ABS-CBN's Senior Vice President for News & Current Affairs, handling news operations across multiple platforms.

    She is Rappler's CEO and Executive Editor.

    Rupert Ambil II

    Rupert Ambil II began his career in the broadcast industry at the Philippines' first 24-hour news channel Sarimanok News Network, now ANC, or the ABS-CBN News Channel. In 2000 he left what could have been lucrative employment to work for an NGO in Eastern Samar.

    Ambil's love for journalism persisted and he found himself back at ABS-CBN in 2005 as a Futures Desk Specialist and Field Producer. He left the company as Head of Field Operations for the News Division.

    Now, he serves as the Executive Director of Move.PH, the civic engagement and citizen journalism arm of Rappler.

    Voltaire Tupaz

    One of the pioneers of Move.PH, Voltaire Tupaz creates and manages platforms for public discussion, opening avenues for citizen involvement online and on the ground. He was one of the initiators of Project Agos, Rappler's disaster and climate change information  platfom. He leads Agos operations during disasters.

    Before joining Rappler, headed a consortium of non-government organizations that promotes sustainable development and food security. He also served as a policy advocacy specialist for two NGOs and an international environmental network, raising awareness on indigenous knowledge systems, appropriate technology, climate change, and other development issues.

    Tupaz is now the editor of MovePH.

    Full Program

    Here is the full schedule of activities:

     

    Friday, July 7

    WATCH: Day 1 of Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness

    8:00 - 10:00 am

    Registration

    Opening of XChange Fair

    10:00 - 10:10 am

    Welcome Remarks

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH

    Movement for Climate Action and Disaster Resilience

    10:10 - 10:20 am

    From climate change to disasters:

    Moving communities through digitally fueled action

    Voltaire Tupaz

    MovePH Editor

    10:20 - 10:40 am

    Climate Action - Impact on Women

    Rina Atienza

    Senior Communications Coordinator , CCC

    10:40 - 10:50 am

    UNICEF Report: Climate change from the children’s perspective

    Javier Bornstein

    Emergency and Disaster Risk Reduction Officer, UNICEF

    10:50 - 11:10 am

    Preparing the youth to be disaster resilient

    Paul Pangilinan

    Commissioner at Large, NYC

    11:10 - 11:20 am

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Bambike Disaster Assesment Response Team

    Bryan McClelland

    Founder of Bambikes

    11:20 - 11:40 pm

    Sparking action in the youth

    GO BAG Project

    Dingdong Dantes

    Yes Pinoy Foundation

    11:40 - 12:00 pm

    Panel Q&A

    Rina Atienza

    Paul Pangilinan

    Dingdong Dantes

    Javier Bornstein

    Voltaire Tupaz

    Moderated by:

    Pebbles Sanchez

    Executive Director, Yes Pinoy Foundation

    12:00 - 1:00 pm

    Lunch

    XChange Fair

    1:00 - 1:15 pm

    Welcome Remarks

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH

    MMShakeDrill: Preparing for the Big One

    1:15 - 1:30 pm

    Keynote Speech

    BGen Danilo Lim (ret)

    Chairman, MMDA

    1:30 - 1:45 pm

    How LGUs are preparing for the Big One

    Herbert Bautista

    Quezon City Mayor (TBC)

    1:45 - 2:30 pm

    #EarthquakePH: The Metro Manila Shake Drill 2017

    Ramon Santiago

    OIC, Flood Control Info Center, MMDA

    2:45 - 3:15 pm

    Panel Q&A: #EarthquakePH

    BGen. Danilo Lim (ret)

    RAdm. Alexander Pama (ret)

    Mayor Herbert Bautista (TBC)

    Ramon Santiago

    MMShakeDrill Quadrant Commanders

    Moderated by:

    Voltaire Tupaz

    MovePH Editor

    3:15 - 3:20 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Liter of Light

    Illac Diaz

    Liter of Light Founder

    3:20 - 3:30 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    K9 SAR Team

    Ramon Santiago

    MMDA

    3:30 - 3:40 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    PH72 - an Emegency Preparedness Tool

    Migel Estoque

    Communications Manager, PDRF

    3:40 - 4:30 pm

    Training Workshop for Agos Volunteers

       Topics:

    • Social Media Training

    • Agos eBayanihan Platform

    • Volunteer Mobilization

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH


    Dr. Reena Estuar, PhD

    Ateneo de Manila University

    4:30 - 4:45 pm

    Inspirational Talk

    Ritche Van Angeles

    Pasig City DRRM Chief

    4:45 - 5:00 pm

    Closing

    XChange Fair


    Saturday, July 8

    WATCH: Day 2 of Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness

    7:00 - 9:00 am

    Registration

    Opening of XChange Fair

    Preparing Vulnerable Communities for Climate Change and Disaster Resiliency

    9:00 - 9:10 am

    Welcome Remarks

    Maria Ressa

    CEO, Rappler

    9:10 - 9:30 am

    Keynote Speech

    Sen. Loren Legarda

     

    9:30 - 9:40 am

    Video recap of Day 1

    Rupert Ambil

    Executive Director, MovePH

    9:40 - 9:50 am

    Policy Reforms for Climate Change

    Cong. Joey Salceda

    2nd District, Albay 

    9:50 - 10:00 am

    Women in Climate Change

    Vernice Victorio

    Commissioner, CCC

    10:00 - 10:30 am

    Panel Q&A: Climate Change Adaptation

    Sen. Loren Legarda

    Joey Salceda (TBC)

    Vernice Victorio

    Javier Bornstein, UNICEF

    Moderated by:

    Voltaire Tupaz

    MovePH Editor

    Community Resiliency

    10:30 - 10:45

    Community Resiliency through Business Continuity

    Rhiza Nery

    Business Continuity Program Manager, PDRF

    10:45 - 11:00

    Bridging the Community

    Darwin Flores

    VP for Community Partnerships, Smart

    11:00 - 11:10

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Humanitarian Leadership Academy

    Jocelyn Pilapil

    Director, Humanitarian Leadership Academy

    11:10 - 11:20

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Staying Alive PH

    Martin Aguda

    Social Media for Social Good

    11:20  - 12:00 nn

    Relaunch of Agos eBayanihan Platform

    Maria Ressa

    CEO, Rappler


    Dr. Reena Estuar, PhD

    Ateneo de Manila University

    12:00 - 1:00 pm

    Lunch Break

    XChange Fair 

    Civic Action for DRRM

    1:00 - 1:30 pm

    Gearing up the Philippine Red Cross

    Sen. Richard Gordon

    Chairman, Philippine Red Cross

    1:30 - 1:50 pm

    Challenges of Disaster Financing  

    Daniel Sinnathamby

    Country Director, Oxfam

    1:50 - 2:10 pm

    Social Action Communities

    Fr. Edwin Gariguez

    CBCP-NASSA

    2:10 - 2:20 pm

    Engaging Communities for Disaster Response

    Hope Hervilla

    Undersecretary, DSWD

    2:20 - 2:30 pm

    Empowering the handicapp to be disaster resilient

    Carissa Galla

    DRR Advisor, Handicap International

    2:30 - 2:40 pm

    Agos Partner Presentations:

    Kaalimidad

    Jay Beltran

    DILG IV-A

    Localizing Disaster Preparedness

    2:40 - 3:00 pm

    National Government

    Ricardo Jalad

    Undersecretary, Office of Civil Defense

    3:00 - 3:10 pm

    Project Listo

    Austere Panadero

    Undersecretary, DILG

    3:10 - 3:20 pm

    Local Government Preparedness

    Manuel Mamba

    Governor, Cagayan

    3:20 - 3:40 pm

    Panel Q&A: Localizing Disaster Preparedness

    Usec. Ricardo Jalad

    Usec. Austere Panadero

    Gov. Manuel Mamba

    Myke Marasigan, QCDRRMO

    Junica Soriano, Save the Children

    Moderated by:

    Gemma Mendoza

    Content and Research Strategy Head, Rappler

    #SafeSchoolsPH: Mainstreaming DRR-CCA in Schools

    3:40 - 4:00 pm

    Education is the key to Zero Casualty

    Ronilda Co

    Director, Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Services, DepEd

    4:00 - 4:20 pm

    From Project NOAH to UP Resilience Institute

    Mahar Lagmay

    Head, UP-NOAH

    4:20 - 4:30 pm

    Project HANDS

    Tetsuya Koide

    Assistant Director, Japan Foundation

    4:30 - 4:50 pm

    Keynote Speech

    Disaster Imagination

    Renato Solidum

    Undersecretary, DOST

    4:50 pm

    Closing

    Photo Taking

    XChange Fair

    – Rappler.com

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    AWARENESS. Panelists of the Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness talk about harnessing pop culture and social media to raise awareness on disaster risk reduction and climate action. Screenshot from Rappler

    MANILA, Philippines – How can we involve more people in the ongoing conversation on disaster preparedness?

    This was a question raised on the first day of the Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness on Friday, July 7.

    One of the summit's speakers, Bryan McClelland, suggested that maybe it's time to incorporate climate change and disaster preparedness into pop culture.

    "What if these topics can be incorporated into our telenovelas? What if real issues that we deal with are incorporated into things that people are already watching and talking about anyway?" McClelland, founder of socio-ecological enterprise Bambike, said during a panel discussion on Friday.

    McClelland cited a study in Brazil that showed the effect of telenovelas on their viewers. After watching a battered female character fight back and get out of an abusive relationship, the viewers felt empowered and were able to save themselves from similar situations.

    "So the power of pop culture and media is very, very strong especially here in the Philippines. So maybe we can kind of open these topics of conversation up into the platforms we're familiar with: your daytime television, your social media platforms, making maybe some of our pop culture influencers more influential for the things that actually matter."

    He added, "If the media you're already consuming starts to address these issues, you're going to start to perk up and pay attention because role models in TV can also be role models in real life."

    Actor and YesPinoy Foundation chair Jose Sixto "Dingdong" Dantes III said it is really a challenge to convey to people the message of disaster risk reduction.

    "I think it is also our duty and responsibility as citizens to help the government, to participate, and not just to participate, but to meaningfully participate," Dantes said during the panel discussion.

    "We have all these platforms – there's television, social media, and media companies who use everything that they can to convey to all people the importance of DRR and climate action. But of course it needs our help, because we're the ones who will give it the multiplier effect…. If everyone acts together, the results will be better," he said in a mix of English and Filipino.

    Paul Pangilinan, commissioner-at-large of the National Youth Commission, talked about the power of the barkada (group).

    "I suggest kayong mga kabataan, you go in groups, kayo-kayo mag-usap anong maitutulong 'pag may disasters. Baka puwedeng magtulong-tulong, magvolunteer," he added.

    (I suggest you young people go in groups, and you talk among yourselves how you can help during disasters. Maybe you can help each other, maybe you can volunteer.)

    Climate Change Commission's Rina Atienza said children should not be left out of the conversation.

    "We shouldn't underestimate children. They actually have imagination that they can come up with solutions….We encourage giving them a voice, giving them a say, because it's supposedly their future we're also looking out for," Atienza explained.

    She added: "What are their opinions about it? And then providing platforms for their solutions to be heard, because we're getting it now in a lot of Facebook, YouTube videos: young children are actually smarter than we give them credit for."

    Before the panel discussion, McClelland, Dantes, Pangilinan, and Atienza each talked about how their own organizations are involved in the movement for climate action and disaster resilience.

    Organized by Rappler's civic engagement arm MovePH, the first ever Agos Summit on Disaster Preparedness will run until Saturday, July 8.

    The two-day summit aims to bring together key stakeholders, tackle pressing issues, and learn from good practices that mitigated risks or achieved zero casualties in a disaster scenario. – Rappler.com


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